Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Thu Jul 24, 2014 2:43 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 2:06 am 
I understand the differences between the two types, but I am getting a bit confused when it comes to lenses. Eg. a 50mm lens on a crop sensor camera would be 80mm (x1.6). I get that... but in my research, I have read that it magnifies the image and in other places, I have read that it's the field of view that is similar to the 80mm. Just need some clarification. Thanks,


-- Nash


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 2:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2008 1:36 am
Posts: 620
Location: Toronto, ON
It's a FoV crop... so the full-frame 50mm lens takes on the field of view of an 80mm lens when fitted to a crop-frame camera. The focal length is still 50mm, it's just the field of view is cropped. The "crop-factor" is just a way of giving you an idea of what kind of field of view you're going to get taking into account the size of the sensor.

Think about point-and-shoots or bridge cameras... they have *tiny* sensors, and their lenses are often rated in single-digit numbers, but via THOSE crop factors (3x or more in some cases) they have "35mm-equivalent" fields of view.

Lens characteristics, i.e. compression, distortion, etc are the same, although because you're losing bits off the full image circle they may not be as apparent. That's partly why I don't like to use my 35mm lens on my 7D because the edges of the frame (which get cropped off) are what makes that lens so interesting on full-frame!

A visual aid and explanation (just found via random googling): http://www.garydatesphotos.com/2010/ful ... ed-sensor/
Image

_________________
Canon EOS 5D MkII | Canon EOS 7D | Canon Digital Rebel XSi | EF 35mm f/1.4L | EF 50mm f/1.8 II | EF 85mm f/1.8 | EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM | EF 135mm f/2L | EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS | 580EX II | LumoPro LP-120

My Flickr


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 2:31 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 09, 2012 10:34 pm
Posts: 1417
Location: Mexico City, Mexico
Plymer wrote:
Think about point-and-shoots or bridge cameras... they have *tiny* sensors, and their lenses are often rated in single-digit numbers, but via THOSE crop factors (3x or more in some cases) they have "35mm-equivalent" fields of view.

Just a small clarification: at least for Canon, almost all point-and-shoots and bridge cameras (the GX1 is an exception, for example) have a crop factor of 5.6x, and I've personally confirmed this.

_________________
Gear: Canon SX20 IS, Canon Rebel T3i, Canon EF-S 18-55mm, Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II
Wishlist: Canon EF 100-400mm f/4-5.6L
Visit me and leave me a comment in My Flickr :)


Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 2:43 am 
Great article... and as I was reading... everything seemed to make sense, until the last paragraph.....

Quote:
I’ve been happily shooting a 50mm prime f/1.4 lens on my 40D for almost a year now, and could care less that the crop factor gives me an 80mm or so image magnification. I just adjust my distance as I compose the shot, and never even THINK about the crop factor.


He talks about the FOV (80mm) but then says image magnification!! I am assuming that he's talking about the image sensor size which cuts off the image real estate that a full frame camera would give...

-- Nash


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 08, 2009 2:29 am
Posts: 711
pierovera wrote:
Just a small clarification: at least for Canon, almost all point-and-shoots and bridge cameras (the GX1 is an exception, for example) have a crop factor of 5.6x, and I've personally confirmed this.


Other exceptions: the "S" line--e.g. S95, S100, S110, etc.--and "G" line--e.g. G11, G12, G15, etc.

on2photography wrote:
He talks about the FOV (80mm) but then says image magnification!! I am assuming that he's talking about the image sensor size which cuts off the image real estate that a full frame camera would give...


Yes, the term "magnification factor" is sometimes used because the crop factor can appear to magnify the image. e.g. print out the red outlined area in the example image above so it fills, say, a 6x4" piece of paper, and print out the yellow outlined area so it also fills a piece of paper the same size (in this example, 6x4"). The print out of the yellow area will appear to be a magnification/enlargement/blow-up of the middle of the print out of the red area. (In this case, it actually would be an enlargement, but remember that the premise is that a given lens will capture the red area when mounted on a full frame camera, and that same lens will capture the yellow area when mounted on a crop frame camera. In other words, this is supposed to represent two different images captured with two different cameras, so in that "real world" case, one would not be an enlargement of the other.)

HTH - Mark


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group