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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2012 7:29 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 5:40 pm
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Location: Singapore
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Please tell me that things that i can improve on in this pic. Maybe you could also give me some tips about sunset/sunrise photography :o

Please do comment on it! Thanks!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2012 9:11 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 08, 2009 11:24 am
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Well there's obviously a massive dynamic range, as is so often the case with sunrise/sunset shots.

You've exposed well for the sky, which has then left the foreground and middleground in complete silouhette. If this is what you're after then great, otherwise you'll need to blend images together.

With landscapes there's pretty much always a high dynamic range in the shot. Graduated Neutral Density filters (GNDs) can 'block' the light in the lighter areas of the image which allow the shooter to capture more detail in the darker foreground without blowing the sky out completely. These come in soft or hard edges.

Another option, rather than going down the hardware route of filters, is to use software. Option 1 is to take 1 shot on a tripod, exposing for the sky, and another shot exposing for the ground. Then in Photoshop these layers can be blended together.

A further option is to bracket, either manually or using the bracketing function on your camera. This will take multiple images of the scene at exposure intervals of your choice (e.g. 2 stops under exposed, 1 stop under exposed, correctly exposed, 1 stop over exposed, 2 stops over exposed - otherwise expressed as -2EV, -1EV, 0EV, +1EV, +2EV). In the example shot of yours, you would need to go further, probably in 2 stop intervals, to capture all the dynamic range. You can then use software like Photomatix to blend the shots into 1 finished image, either using the subtle and more natural looking Exposure Fusion or full on HDR.

In both software instances, using a tripod is very beneficial


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 12:31 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 5:40 pm
Posts: 8
Location: Singapore
Thanks for your tips dubaiphil! :D

Will remember that but the effect of the foreground is what i wanted as by showing more details of the foreground, it kind of me mess up the picture because it is a school & it will spoil the whole composition of the sunset. :o


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 1:49 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2011 10:52 am
Posts: 94
phil focused on the technical aspects so I will leave those and focus on the composition. There are two parts to a silhouette. First is the sky/sunset itself and second is the item being silhouetted.

You captured the sun very well just as it is clipping the horizon. If the sky had some more interesting clouds you might have got a better looking image but that is an issue we seldom have direct control over.

I think the main problem with the image (from a composition point of view) is the silhouette itself. For a visually interesting silhouette you need a really interesting horizon. That means an interesting city skyline with lots of interestingly shaped buildings or hills with interesting buildings/trees on the top or you need to get up close to something that is visually interesting. A lighthouse or a church with an interesting steeple, an old dead tree or something else that provides an interesting shape when silhouetted.

For me your image fails because the interesting looking shapes are too far away. You have big, uninteresting buildings close to the camera, which obscure part of the horizon. These aren't visually interesting. You also have distant cranes that would be interesting but they are partially obscured by the foreground buildings and also too far away. There is also a building on the horizon that looks like it might be interesting, but again, it is too far away.

Conclusion
You have a technically good sunset but the composition doesn't really make for an interesting shot. Really the only thing you can do to improve the composition would be to move to a new location.

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I am learning photo graphee - see the results at www.danmarchant.com


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2012 10:19 pm 
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Location: Kanduhar, Afghanistan
Watch sunsets as the sun goes further down the colors come out more, specially if you have some good clouds to bounce the light off. If you would have waited for the sun to just get below the horizon those few clouds in the shy I bet would chance to a nice orange.

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Canon 550D | Canon EF 35mm 1:2 | Canon 50 f/1.8 II | Sigma 18-125mm DC OS | Tamron SP 70-300mm Di VC USD | Canon 430EX II
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