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 Post subject: A beginner's doubt..
PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:04 pm 
Just bought a canon dslr and am really struggling to take some pictures. Well, i tried to take a shot of the running toy train inside the mall but not able to achieve it. I know the basic, i mean the definition of all the creative modes.. My main problem was lighting, I tried to increase the ISO but in vain, all came out dark.. Again in the morning, i tried to shoot a running car, well, i's able to do, but it was over exposed.., is it possible to have a blurry pic having a larger f number with the minimum ISO during day light ? Please guide me where did i go wrong ?? javascript:emoticon(':roll:') Thanks in advance..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:22 pm 
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Hi Shosim and welcome to the forums.
You have to be more speciffic. Wich Canon model , which modes, what adjustments you have made and what were the parameters (ISO Shutter, speed , aperture).
Maybe you have changed the exposure compensation whithout beeng aware of it. But one can't be sure with so few details.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jul 10, 2011 9:39 pm 
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and you could post example image so we can see your situation of shooting, along with exif data, mostly shooting a running car would need panning tech, and not small f number, if i got right what is your problem

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 20, 2011 8:37 pm 
I assume you tried full manual mode or something.
If the picture is blurry then your shutterspeed was to low (or you moved your camera)

Basic rules:
The lower the shutterspeed the more light gets in the camera (and the more chance of blurry pictures due to movement)
The lower the F number the more light gets into the camera (and the more blurred the background is, which is good in portraits but not in landscapes for example)
The higher the ISO number the more light you get into the camera.

I suggest you try Aperture priority mode for a while. You decide the aperture the camera decides the rest. Quite impossible NOT to get an correctly exposed shot in Aperture priority mode unless there is really not enough light for the capabilities of the lens and camera.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 2:23 am 
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Location: Gold Coast Australia
Hi Shosim, I would advise using shutter priority for moving objects if you want to stop the object and pan the object. Try speeds of 1/200s + to get a sharp photo and let the camera decide on the aperture and ISO. Have a look at the tutorial on blurring the background of moving cars on the forum.

As you are new to DSLR I would suggest on static objects use program mode and see what setting the camera determines and adjust these to your needs. Using P mode as a base line will help as cameras these days in most conditions rarely get it wrong and gives you an idea of where to start. As suggested above, post a photo with the EXIF.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 10:11 am 
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Maybe start with one mode, the user guide and an object in your home. Try changing one setting (over a range maybe 5 settings) and see how it effects the shot (maybe the aperture). Then try changing another setting (maybe ISO) and see what difference that makes.

If you jump around between subjects and settings you can easily confuse yourself (I know I did when I first started). I found it easier to learn the basics one setting at a time, then you can combine your knowledge to start to get creative. Read the hints and tips on this site and other photography sites, don't expect to by perfect overnight and remember every day is a school day :)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 11:36 am 
Well since more of the fellow here gave you some good replies,I will only leave you with one advice: always shoot ISO100 outside. There's rarely opportunities when you need more,so staying with the lowest value means you'll get the maximum image quality.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 3:12 pm 
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The absolute best thing you could do is post an example of one of the shots that didn't come out. DSLRs, despite their amazing capabilities, are not able to take photos on their own - no matter how many scene or auto modes, there will always be situations where some photographic skill will be required to get the shot, so a little learning of what settings changes do, and when to choose different settings, is crucial to taking the next step from being a person with a camera to becoming a photographer.

There are many settings the camera could have gotten wrong, or that you could have chosen wrong, so the EXIF data attached to your photo will be the dead giveaway - if you can find some way to get your photo online with EXIF intact, and link it or post it here, we can compare the results of the photo to the EXIF settings, and determine where the mistakes were made.

Whatever you do...don't blame Canon, and don't blame DSLRs. Many people move up to a DSLR thinking they'll get brilliant photographs compared to their P&S. And sometimes, the auto modes can do that, taking advantage of the large sensor and good glass under perfect conditions. But photography (thank god) still is an art, and still requires a modicum of skill and practice to get the shot in all conditions, for when it's not outside on a sunny, cloudless afternoon!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 4:08 pm 
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Location: Slovakia
Quote:
always shoot ISO100 outside

thats not really a good idea, because you can miss shot. I also thought that iso 100 will be always enough in sunny day until i got a blurred picture of a moving train.

On most modern dslrs you cant see much difference between iso 100 and 400.

My advice would be - if you have opportunity, use auto ISO. On 60D it works well

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 11:27 pm 
There is plenty of situations where you can need more then ISO100.
If its a cloudy day and you are in a park with a lot of trees ISO100 wont be enough, especially if you need a fast shutterspeed for that duck flapping his wings while he dives in the water (just an example).

AutoISO works great. Especially on an Nikon D7000 for example where you can put a limit on how high the auto iso should go. You just say to the camera: I want you to do ISO automatically but don't go above ISO400 for example, and it doesnt go above that figure. Not sure how that works on a Canon. They usually are a bit behind with those technologies at the Canon camp, probably to busy finding space for all those extra megapixels or something.

Also moving objects like racecars or trains try panning with the subject (move the camera at the same speed as the subject). Background will be all blurry but subject should be in focus then. Also gives you a sense of motion in the photo. See also the cameralabs DSLR-tutorial on this subject.

Sometimes your camera settings are correct but you are just simply the wrong technique. As I said look at the top menubar and click on DSLR-tutorials that get you started on a few things.


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