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 Post subject: stuck inside
PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 12:21 pm 
Hi all
I'v run into the problem where I'm trying to experiment with taking pictures. I'm reading as much as I can on the net then I try taking pic's using the advise given. My human subjects have had enough of me snapping pics of them. I'm injured so i'm stuck to the couch. what can I use? For the most part I'm trying to learn the M setting on my 550, I am also trying a bit using a flash (speedlight 580 II). What can I do?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 2:13 pm 
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Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 5:23 pm
Posts: 815
Location: Boca Raton, FL, USA
Sorry to hear being stuck to the couch! Good though that you've still got the passion to keep playing with the camera even in tight confines and limited scenes.

Experimenting with M mode and getting to know the flash are two great ideas. I'd also consider learning all of the camera's features and how they work. Play with the HDR mode to understand first highlight exposure and second shadow exposure, and with the manual settings how much to set the exposure value between them at. Maybe do some depth of field experiments with big apertures vs small to see how your lenses perform. Might be a good time to try some still/macro type shooting on small subjects around the house, especially with the shallow DOF - blurring background on tiny objects with shallow DOF to hide the fact that it's indoors - and also creating the illusion of the object being bigger than it is. Some high ISO work could be fun - since you're in dark environments indoors - try finding the sweet spot between proper exposure and ISO - it'll help illustrate how noise is not only related to high ISO, but moreso to underexposure in high ISO - sometimes a properly exposed ISO3200 can have less noise than an underexposed ISO1600. And I'd suggest experimenting with ISO6400 and ISO12800 using the HDR mode - it's a revelation! Set the HDR to +1 (the minimum setting), then take some shots at the highest ISO settings - compare these to taking a straight ISO6400 or ISO12800 shot without HDR. It really shows you how the image stacking of the HDR has a great side effect of significantly reducing noise and restoring detail...and making those very high ISOs actually usable.

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Last edited by zackiedawg on Fri Jul 30, 2010 3:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 2:17 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 12:59 pm
Posts: 6009
Location: The Netherlands
You can also watch a sport show on TV and shoot that. the pictures will be poor, but it will improve your timing a lot. :)

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 2:33 pm 
Thanks zackiedawg, that will give me something to read up on as I am a beginner and most of the things you suggested I haven't heard of, such as "Play with the HDR mode to understand first highlight exposure and second shadow exposure" I'll google it and then attempt some shots.
Citruspers Your suggestion does actually make a lot of sense. though I did laugh for a bit after reading it, and again as I wrote this.
thanks guys


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 3:07 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 12:59 pm
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Location: The Netherlands
I know, right, the idea sounds insane, but I got the tip from a sports shooter. Get well soon mate :)

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I take pictures so quickly, my highschool was "Continuous High".


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 10:06 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 2:52 pm
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Location: Scotland
If you can make it from the couch to a sink you can try water droplet shots. Let's you practise with the lighting and flash as well as the effects of shutter speed when shooting water motion. You can also stir all sorts of colours in to a glass of water and see the effects you can achieve.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 2:29 pm 
May I also suggest getting a few books on many aspects of photography such as lighting, exposure etc. I've learned quite a bit from reading, then doing as i've learned.

Especially something like Macro like previously suggested. Read up on Macro photography and then exercise what you've learned while stuck on the couch. Practice makes perfect.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 3:10 pm 
So you're an armchair photographer?


:lol:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 02, 2010 3:23 pm 
LOL


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