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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:09 pm 
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As a sequel to the incredibly famous "Things I Hate About My Camera" here I'd like to warn you over some really dumb effect that can ruin your pics, when shooting with a DSLR
I just made a testshot that is normally exposed at f13, 1sec. Then I shone a flashlight from behind into the viewfinder and the camera captures the same scene at f13, 1/6sec. That is under-exposure by almost 3EVs :shock:
How to avoid this maddening effect?
- If you're shooting in the sun with backlight beware when using a tripod and a remote trigger. Just shade the viewfinder.
- If you wear glasses, your eye has more distance from the ocular and thus chances are that some stray-light might sneak into your viewfinder and mess up the exposure. Wear a hat with a flap or use your hand to keep out the sun.
- use a P&S :wink:
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addendum: my trusty old Olympus OM2 had the very nice feature that the exposure was measured by the light reflecting from the film. As the mirror is up when taking the exposure, no stray-light could disturb this camera. Well DSLRs certainly still have a way to come...

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Last edited by Thomas on Wed Aug 08, 2007 6:00 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 7:28 pm 
Thomas,

Thanks for the report! I atually wear glasses and now that you mention it some of my photos where there is a light behind or above have come out a little off. Fortunately my vision is only poor in my right eye and seeing as I'm trying to convert to a lefty I may be able to take the glasses off to shoot the picture. I think I will try that as soon as I can recreate the situation where light would have gotten into the view finder.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 8:13 pm 
Both the D80 and the D40 allow the user to fine tune the dioptric on the viewfinder. This allows for people with some eye conditions, such as myopia, to see correctly through the viewfinder, as if they were using their usual glasses.

Also, don't forget that little plastic piece that can be used to cover the viewfinder (you'll have to remove the rubber on the viewfinder to apply that piece).


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 10:10 pm 
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This sadly affects most DSLRs and most manuals even have a disclaimer about it somewhere! They all tend to say if you're shooting without your eye against the viewfinder (such as on a tripod), then cover the viewfinder opening to avoid stray light getting in. Many cameras come with a little slide-on shield for the viewfinder which is sometimes fitted on the strap...

Gordon


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:58 pm 
Unfortunately my eye sight in my right eye is beyond the adjustable range of the dioptic.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 6:09 pm 
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So just make sure, the sun is not shining directly from the side.
I think under normal circumstances the effect can be disregarded.
I measured -1..-2EV though on my latest shooting from a tripod in the evening sun :(

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2007 12:21 pm 
Hi Thomas

Can you please share some light as to how is it possible for light to enter from the viewfinder and finds its way to the sensor ?

Forgive my ignorance :oops:

DavidL


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2007 12:56 pm 
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That's easy!
I'm talking about the sensor that measures the light to compute the right exposure. This sensor is normally sitting in the prism and is affected by light shining into the viewfinder.
I'm not talking about the sensor that captures the pic, once the mirror goes up. This sensor is immune to light that shines into the viewfinder.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2007 1:49 pm 
Thanks Thomas but err..

For arguement sake..:oops:

light enter from the front lens ..and 'shines' on the prism which will
reflect to the light opposite , to the sensor at the back.

Now, say, some light enters from the viewfinder .. back of course.
Having entered the opposite direction, wouldnt the light reflect opposite it and away from the sensor ? like out the other way :?:

Confused sorry. :? :?:

DavidL


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 12:23 pm 
Thanks for the tip Thomas.

I actually recall a section of my D40 manual which instructs you to remove the rubber piece from the viewfinder and in it's place slide on the plastic cover which stops any light getting into the viewfinder when you are taking remote control or timer pictures while not looking through the viewfinder.

Having said all that I have seen numerous times on TV crowds of photographers holding pro slr's over their heads while taking shots because of the crowd and the inability to get a clear view of the subject (normally a celebrity). Do they place a cover over their viewfinder when doing this? :?:


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 Post subject: Eyepiece shutters
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 12:56 pm 
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Konovalov wrote:
... I have seen numerous times on TV crowds of photographers holding pro slr's over their heads while taking shots because of the crowd and the inability to get a clear view of the subject (normally a celebrity). Do they place a cover over their viewfinder when doing this? :?:

Some cameras, such as top end Canons and Nikons, have an eyepiece shutter. For cameras which don't there may be alternatives. Canon have, with their new EOS 40D, thoughtfully provided a cover which "is provided on included strap". Hardly elegant but better than nothing.

Bob.

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 Post subject: Re: Eyepiece shutters
PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2007 1:57 pm 
Bob Andersson wrote:
Konovalov wrote:
... I have seen numerous times on TV crowds of photographers holding pro slr's over their heads while taking shots because of the crowd and the inability to get a clear view of the subject (normally a celebrity). Do they place a cover over their viewfinder when doing this? :?:

Some cameras, such as top end Canons and Nikons, have an eyepiece shutter. For cameras which don't there may be alternatives. Canon have, with their new EOS 40D, thoughtfully provided a cover which "is provided on included strap". Hardly elegant but better than nothing.

Bob.


Ok thanks for that Bob. The Nikon solution for my D40 compared to Canon was to just provide a platic cover by itself which isn't attaced to anything. :shock: The words very easy to loose come to mind so I have mine stashed away in one of the small pockets inside my Lowepro Slingshot AW 100 bag.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 5:14 pm 
Brate wrote:
Unfortunately my eye sight in my right eye is beyond the adjustable range of the dioptic.


Is it the same with your left eye? If not, perhaps you could train yourself to compose your pics with your left eye? I thinks I've read some comments about that here in the forum.

Easier said than done, of course, I'm 32 and luckily I still don't need glasses of any kind, as a right handed person it's only natural for me to use my right eye, but I guess I would give a try at composing with my left eye if I had better vision with it.

BTW, my sister is left handed and tells me that she doesn't care much and that she's already used to handling right handed oriented things after a lifetime doing so, but I think it's a bit unfair, there's a good deal of left-handeds out there, millions, and well into the 21st century there're still hardly any products specifically designed for them. Having no choice in the matter, I think it finally becomes natural for them to find, for example, the shutter release button in the right, but it doesn't take a genious to figure out that if the mayority of people were left handed, shutter buttons would be in the left.


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 Post subject: Re: Eyepiece shutters
PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 11:58 pm 
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Konovalov wrote:
Bob Andersson wrote:
Konovalov wrote:
... I have seen numerous times on TV crowds of photographers holding pro slr's over their heads while taking shots because of the crowd and the inability to get a clear view of the subject (normally a celebrity). Do they place a cover over their viewfinder when doing this? :?:

Some cameras, such as top end Canons and Nikons, have an eyepiece shutter. For cameras which don't there may be alternatives. Canon have, with their new EOS 40D, thoughtfully provided a cover which "is provided on included strap". Hardly elegant but better than nothing.

Bob.


Ok thanks for that Bob. The Nikon solution for my D40 compared to Canon was to just provide a platic cover by itself which isn't attaced to anything. :shock: The words very easy to loose come to mind so I have mine stashed away in one of the small pockets inside my Lowepro Slingshot AW 100 bag.


Hi there. Don't quote me on this but I'd be surprised if your viewfinder cover doesn't share it's design with that of the D80's. Have a look and see if it doesn't have the "lip" which allows it to be slid on to your neck strap.

Zorro.

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2007 11:45 am 
Hmm, you might be right there Zorro. I will have a look into that.


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