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PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 6:16 pm 
Hi, this is my 1st post here. I want to upgrade from my Olympus EPL-1 and was considering the Canon T3i. I want to make sure I consider all of my options though.

I would describe myself as an intermediate who shoots primarily landscape or architecture. Very little portrait stuff, other than just basic family photos. I'm also very interested in the 1080p capabilities and want to start shooting video more seriously.

I would like to get into a more entry level body at this time with the kit lens, and then build my lens collection and upgrade the body as I go along.

For my interests, what would you suggest, Canon, Nikon, Sony, or something else? Thanks -- Matt


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 7:03 pm 
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Recommending a brand in itself is generally reserved for fanboys though I would say that Sony's SLT series is perhaps better suited to video with its more practical full-time autofocus. Canon and Nikon's offerings are somewhat sluggish and don't really keep up with fast moving subjects. However, if you're not recording video where the subject frequently goes in and out of the DoF, Sony's advantage is somewhat reduced. For shooters, you can't really go wrong with any of the brands - it's really a question of working out which system is best for you.

I would suggest handling all of the cameras you've considered and navigate their menus. The general feel and ergonomics quite often settle the debate of which to get. On the subject of building your lens collection, have you reviewed how widely available they are where you live?

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 7:55 pm 
Thanks for the response. I'll go to the local "best" camera shop in town and handle them myself. It's good to know that it's all down to personal preference and you really can't go wrong with whatever you choose.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2012 3:18 am 
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Is there some reason you've ruled out Oly's E-M5? That would seem to me to be your best option since you could continue to use all of your current lenses, and the 5-axis IBIS (in-body image stabilization) is great for video (because, generally speaking, you want to keep your shutter speed at around twice your frame rate. e.g. 1/50 shutter when shooting 24 or 25 frames per second). It's also much closer in size to your current camera than the T3i. And note that all Canon DSLRs except the 5D Mark III have issues with moire when shooting video which will probably crop up when shooting architecture which is one of your primary subjects.

Having said that, if you really want to go with something in the Canon EOS Rebel line, I would recommend the T4i over the previous model because of the upgraded Movie Servo AF with STM lenses.

Having said that, if budget prevents you from considering the T4i, but you're OK with a larger camera body, I would recommend a Panasonic GH2 because, at the moment, it probably represents the best value in a hybrid stills/video camera with interchangeable lenses. And it can also use all of your current Oly lenses.

Full disclosure: I own both a Canon T4i and Panasonic GH2 - Mark


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 6:50 am 
Thanks for the tip. One of the reasons that I wanted to get into a Dslr was the bigger sensor. I'm really not that technically informed, so it's hard for me to discuss what I want. I've just picked up that the micro 4/3 sensor is always going to give lesser quality than the larger sensor in an SLR, or am I wrong on that. By the way, I don't own any micro 4/3 lenses other than the kit lense that came with the camera.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2012 7:38 am 
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Pocaloc wrote:
Thanks for the tip. One of the reasons that I wanted to get into a Dslr was the bigger sensor. I'm really not that technically informed, so it's hard for me to discuss what I want. I've just picked up that the micro 4/3 sensor is always going to give lesser quality than the larger sensor in an SLR, or am I wrong on that. By the way, I don't own any micro 4/3 lenses other than the kit lense that came with the camera.

Generally a larger sensor results in better quality but the Micro 4/3 sensor isn't so much smaller than the APS-C sensor in most DSLRs that there have a monumental difference unless you shoot at night. A really sharp lens on a Micro 4/3 lens can easily compete with, if not beat, a DSLR with a cheap, not so sharp lens. There are some things you can't get around with a smaller sensor such as reduced DoF control and dynamic range but seeing that you don't plan on doing much portraiture, the former perhaps won't matter too much to you.

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Body: Canon EOS 70D
Lenses: Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM, Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II, Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM, Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 1:54 am 
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Pocaloc wrote:
I've just picked up that the micro 4/3 sensor is always going to give lesser quality than the larger sensor in an SLR, or am I wrong on that.


All else being equal, yes, a larger sensor will have an advantage over a smaller one. But all else is never, ever equal--different sensor tech, different manufacturers, different pixel densities, different processing engines, different camera bodies with different features, different lenses, etc.

And since you only have the kit lens thus far, I think your money may be better spent on another lens or two, instead of a new body (and another kit lens). For example, Oly's 12mm f2.0 lens is generally well regarded, and the 12mm (24mm full frame equiv.) focal length would be well suited for landscapes and architecture.

And IMO 720p video is fine for most hobbyists and/or folks just starting out. It's not until you get to the point where you're willing to spend upwards of $5,000 on your rig (and another $5,000 on your editing suite) that 1080p is worth it.

My 2ยข - Mark


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