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 Post subject: To chomp or to chew.
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 11:29 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 10:31 am
Posts: 28
Location: South Korea
Hello community!

There have been so many "First time buyer" posts and I admire how much patience you-all go through to help out newbies. I would like to ask for the same thing but more on the route of expenses vs learning curve.

The main question: Should I jump to a Canon EOS 60D or should I start out with a Nikon D5000?

I have not much education with photography (formal/non-formal) but I love taking pictures with whatever I have. I happen to travel a lot and want to immortalize whatever I find interesting. I don't plan to go pro (if that means exhibiting pictures for profit) but that doesn't stop me from wanting to take better images... or even learn how. With my old and humble digital camera, I usually spend time tinkering with the settings (lots of trial-and-errors), which lead me to consider buying a DSLR.

For now, there's an available second-hand Nikon D5000 with a 50mm and an 18-250mm lense (which I hope is a good starter pack), second hand. I figured, I'd start that route for the sake of learning the basics. But then, I realized that I'd be spending for lenses and maybe upgrade in time. So if I'm to spend a little bit more, I figured I'd jump right in and buy a brand new Canon EOS 60D. I have read some reviews and compared it with some other DSLRs, and for what I think suits me best is the 60D (50D would have been perfect if it only had a fully articulated lcd). What's stopping me is the fear that it might be too complex for a beginner.

So should I surrender to a second-hand, beginner-friendly (as what Gordon says) unit then switch to a higher end one after some learning? Or would the learning curve won't make much of a difference that I'd be better off buying my target unit?

I hope I have given enough information to avail help from the community. Thank you.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 12:06 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 14, 2010 9:38 pm
Posts: 55
Location: middle of the Canadian prairie
Hi!

with the Q button, the 2nd wheel at the back and the multi-way controller, the 60D is actually very easy for a beginner to learn to use... easier than the rebel series for me... it's actually what setting to use that takes time and with lots of practice, which is the same with whatever DSLR you eventually decide to buy... full auto and creative auto(CA) along with the preset modes in the command dial will help you along the way if you prefer not to go directly to PSAM (PTvAvM on canon) modes...

get hold of both cameras and decide which has the more intuitive buttons for you... :)

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Canon 60D, EFS 15-85mm IS USM, EF 50 F1.8 II


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 2:02 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:07 pm
Posts: 799
Location: Ottawa, Canada
If you have the $$ -- and are really serious about photography, then the mid-range camera would suit you well. What I am perplexed about is your comparison of the D5000 (which has recently been replaced by the D51000 which fixes the issues with the wonky hinge placement on the D5000).

Have you considered the D90 or D7000 yet? The things that I really like about mid-range cameras is the top-mounted LCD and double wheel controls. These 2 features are invaluable in my opinion.

But -- on the other hand, if you are new to photography, there is merit in making the choice of spending less on the body, and more on lenses to get your footprint established.

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Olympus e-620 / 14-42mm / 40-150mm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 3:45 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 10:31 am
Posts: 28
Location: South Korea
Thank you for the quick responses (I'm actually surprised I already got 2 replies). Both suggestions are very much noted.

D5000 vs 60D is in a case of price rather than functionality. Considering that if I should start a bit low, D5000 with some lenses and some extras (filter, bag, duster, and what not) are just 10 miles away from me, and I got the budget for it (since it's second-hand around $650, new = roughly $900). However, I still intend to switch to Canon only for the reason that it is more supported in my country (as much as I observe, and excluding online shopping). I just thought that if I'm to spend some numbers for a new item, I might as well go for the new ones (except for MARKs 'cause they're just too intimidating price wise and usage wise). That lead me to 50D but really torn me since I have a habit of shooting on weird angles so fully articulated lcd is at least top 3 on my list. Hence; the D60.

As for lenses, I've been (and still am) self-analyzing for weeks to determine what my style is. Digicams don't ask for that. Apprently, detachable lenses do. And with the prices, and considering that they could last for decades, maybe 2/3/4 months more waiting won't hurt them. So I might just stick to basics first (maybe 18-55mm and one of those with other numbers in it... so I'll learn what's the deal with it).

But I'm quite candid on taking shots and sometimes get frustrated with a basic point and shoot that takes 2/3/4 seconds before the next shot. I certainly won't get the perfect shot at the time a car is about to hit a post some meters away. Strolling at night and taking pictures of whatever weird shapes I see takes about 60% of my SD card. Then comes the self-portrait which is about 10-20%. Well, I'm guilty of not knowing much but I need to know a starting pack of lenses (if there's no one lens that's fit for what I do).

I apologize for being long-winded. I don't know the words-per-reply limit is in here. But really thank you for the input.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 11:39 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:07 pm
Posts: 799
Location: Ottawa, Canada
If you are already keen on Canon - then it doesn't make sense to me that you would invest in Nikon. Maybe I am just not getting it - but if you know where you are going to go product-wise, then just simply go there.

I would submit to you that Nikon and Canon are pretty equal in terms of market share and product coverage. Lenses are about even as well. There are plenty of them, at all price points.

I would never buy a camera based on market share though -- you need to get these cameras into your hands and actually use them before you make a decision. The camera that feels best to you is the one you should own.

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Olympus e-620 / 14-42mm / 40-150mm
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 10:31 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 10:31 am
Posts: 28
Location: South Korea
I just came from the nearest Canon shop and tried out 60D. The buttons are intuitive indeed and a lot of the functions can easily be understood. I just love it! I can't point my finger on it but it just feels right.

So thank you for the encouragement and feedback. Now I just have to decide on which package to go (lens wise). Again, thank you.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 12:53 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:07 pm
Posts: 799
Location: Ottawa, Canada
If you are starting out --- the 17-85 is a nice first/starting point as a walk around lens.

_________________
Olympus e-620 / 14-42mm / 40-150mm
Metz 48 AF-1
Kata 3-N-1 20, LowePro Orion Mini, LowePro Nova 2
My Flickr


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 12:58 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 10:31 am
Posts: 28
Location: South Korea
I've placed my order with a 3-lens package. Thank you for all your time.

If I may, I'd ask for a guide on how to physically inspect lenses. How to buy, what to buy, which suits me best are there. But I need advice on examining my lenses after use, to better care for them. I also need the knowledge if in case I am to buy a used lens.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 2:05 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:07 pm
Posts: 799
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Have you tried to google lens care and maintenance yet?

http://tinyurl.com/3zols4o

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Olympus e-620 / 14-42mm / 40-150mm
Metz 48 AF-1
Kata 3-N-1 20, LowePro Orion Mini, LowePro Nova 2
My Flickr


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 10, 2011 3:26 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 10:31 am
Posts: 28
Location: South Korea
Thank you for the link. I did some research before posting. But I was looking more for "What to watch out for when buying a second-hand lens." Although I can not fully put my trust on one, and prefer to buy a brand new one, there's just so many of them nearby. I ask how people personally take care of their lenses beyond what is usually mentioned over the net.

I finally found my style. Night shots + Architecture. The 50 mm lens is amazing! The other two aren't much.

Thank you guys for your advises. I'm happy with my Canon EOS 60D.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 10, 2011 6:06 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:07 pm
Posts: 799
Location: Ottawa, Canada
Glad you are happy with your new camera. Nothing like a good prime as far as I am concerned. All my days shooting 35mm film, I only used a prime lens. That was mainly due to budget constraints, but over time, I understood how to get the best out of it.

My next camera purchase will likely be the Oly-Zuiko 25mm pancake "prime" (OK, so arguably not a true prime, but with the 2X crop factor it's the same field of vision as a true prime).

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Olympus e-620 / 14-42mm / 40-150mm
Metz 48 AF-1
Kata 3-N-1 20, LowePro Orion Mini, LowePro Nova 2
My Flickr


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