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PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2011 6:01 pm 
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I explained you earlier Canon500D that with a FF DSLR the coverage not per se bigger is. I have let you see the Canon 5D has 96% coverage while the Nikon D7000 has 100% coverage.
FF DSLRs give a bigger view through the viewfinder than cropped-frame DSLRs, but coverage? No, there isnt a difference between FF or APS-Cs or whatever when it comes to coverage.

cheers

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2011 6:03 pm 
Ruben I think what he means is that with a given lens, a full frame sensor camera will offer more field of view.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2011 6:04 pm 
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That could be the other coverage yes...
But:
Quote:
The viewfinders, as mentioned, also offer less coverage.

Im not so sure about that Jeremy :wink:

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Ruben

Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
Tamron 17-50 2.8, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM,
Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2011 6:12 pm 
Yeah I know what was written is ambiguous but Im talking about what I think he meant. You are of course right in what you say too


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 07, 2011 8:17 pm 
The pics are not my parents -- very very good friends that kinda played absentee grandparents to our children over the years.

Insofar as the HDMI port is concerned on the e-620 -- you don't need one. There is a usb to analog TV cable included in the box.

Check out this link regarding sensor sizes and cropping. Essentially, full frame digital is identical to a 35mm film frame. Everything else is smaller. The article puts it in a way that is pretty easy to understand.

The one thing to remember about FourThirds format is that Oly built their entire DSLR range based on these new standard -- including the lenses. Size and weight are key considerations in their product design.

One thing about the e420 is that it's not got IS -- whereas the e-620 does -- and because it's in-body, any lens will have the benefit of image stabilization. Of course, because it's body based, you won't see the IS when you are looking through the viewfinder. No biggie -- the shots will be stabilized so long as you have it turned on correctly.


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 1:31 am 
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The coverage information is publicly available. 98% coverage means that there is 2% missing when looking through the viewfinder.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 7:16 am 
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Yes, that's true. What do you want to say with that? Not all FF viewfinders have 100% coverage.

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Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
Tamron 17-50 2.8, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM,
Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 7:37 am 
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In case you're still wondering, here's the difference between a crop frame sensor (Also called an APS-C sensor by many brands or DX sensor by Nikon):

Image

The green square in the image is full frame, and the red square is the Crop Sensor, APS-C or DX. As you can see, the Crop Sensor "Crops" the image, meaning that if you use a lens made for full frame sensors, your field of view will be cropped. This makes wide angle lenses designed for full frame sensors less useful on crop sensors, however telephoto lenses will give you an even more cropped field of view, which could be a major advantage if you want a big telephoto lens.
"Full Frame" sensors are 35mm wide, just like a strip of 35mm film, ergo full frame sensors. Crop sensors are about 25mm wide, meaning that they crop your image.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 9:00 am 
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Err...I thought they were 36 mm x 24 mm (give or take a little) ? Crop sensors are about 2 4mm x 16 mm (again, give or take a little), no ?

Oh well, it's only 1 mm :)...

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 7:37 pm 
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Yes, it's always "Give or take a little". 35mm sensors are always 36mm, but it simplifies it to say 35mm. Also, crop sensors have a range, they can be anywhere from 20-28mm. I simply chose something in the middle.

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Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 08, 2011 9:08 pm 
Thank you evan, now I see the difference...

Quote:
he pics are not my parents -- very very good friends that kinda played absentee grandparents to our children over the years.

It's always good to have such good friends :)

Quote:
Insofar as the HDMI port is concerned on the e-620 -- you don't need one. There is a usb to analog TV cable included in the box.

yeah but if you've got a big HD TV, you could see the pics with much more resolution than analog imput, is it correct?

Today I tried an E-450 I didn't liked the grip, it is insufficient for my hand and I can't hold the camera firmly to make sharp pics I think. Meybe it's due also to the extreme lightness of the body/lens.
The viewfinder is very small compared to the D3100, very small.
However I liked how compact are the lenses, specifically the 40-150 has the dimension of a nikon 18-55.

But I very like the concept of the olympus, I always dreamed having such a small lenses on a reflex but still 300mm focal lenght.

Now I want to give a try to the E-620, and I hope oly has resolved those problems.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:37 pm 
The e-620 viewfinder is much better and brighter than the e-420 or e-510 -- but don't forget that it's smaller to begin with because of the FourThirds format.

I also have a large panel TV -- and yes, you are correct, you won't get quite the same affect over a usb connection as you would a HDMI connection. I rarely show my pics on my TV -- I am always looking over them on a PC or laptop. If I have the desire to look at them big via HDMI, I simply plug the laptop into the TV -- I have ample inputs to do this. I guess HDMI output depends on what you think your needs are.

You will find the grip on the e-620 only slightly larger than the e-420, but it has a more grippy feel with rubber lining in the right spots. I prefer the Oly grips because the camera is so much smaller to begin with. If I didn't shoot Oly, I think I would be shooting Nikon - but it wouldn't be an entry-level Nikon -- the D7000 would be the lowest I would go for. From a price point perspective, to me it made better sense to pay what I would have paid for an entry-level DSLR and get a camera with mid-range features/capabilities (e.g. DOF preview, auto-bracketing, wireless flash firing, etc.).

I find that the 40-150 gets used way more than the 14-42. I really like the way it feels in hand. Remember something else about Oly -- the lenses have great bokeh, but the depth of field - because of the sensor crop - is doubled. Which means thinking through aperture priority shooting for shallow depth of field.


Last edited by jwnrw on Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:19 pm 
Pentax K-x, K-r and K5 are lightweight and good at high ISO.
The Sony NEX 3 and 5 are also very good, but not DSLR.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:43 pm 
If you think you can go with a mirrorless, then in addition to the Sony NEX, are the Oly PENs - but the speed isn't quite up to DSLR standards. The new crop of Pentax DSLRs are very well done.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 12, 2011 2:38 pm 
Hello, no I don't want mirrorless, nothing wrong with them but I just want a reflex :D

Pentax, I've seen them the other day, the body is little smaller but it's roughly the same dimension of a D3100, with a lens attached, although it has more advanced features and better lcd.

The problem of dimensions I think relates to the lenses, the APS-C cameras require longer lenses to get the same focal leght as 4/3 camera. So on 4/3 you save a lot of space, but the sensor is smaller so you get more noise, that's the price you pay.

Quote:
If I didn't shoot Oly, I think I would be shooting Nikon - but it wouldn't be an entry-level Nikon -- the D7000 would be the lowest I would go for. From a price point perspective, to me it made better sense to pay what I would have paid for an entry-level DSLR and get a camera with mid-range features/capabilities (e.g. DOF preview, auto-bracketing, wireless flash firing, etc.).

Well, for sure D7000 is a great camera but it's little bulky and pricey, it seems just little bigger than D90, but it has compatibility with older MF lenses.

Anyway I found a store that has the E-620, so in the next days I'm gonna try it. Man I also found an E-420 wich sells for 240 euros, tempting...

My choices are Olympus (E-620) or Nikon (D90 or D7000).

PS
jwnrw, how is the E-620 doing at night and lowlight levels? Cause from the tests I saw it produces dark images that require big exp compensation, like +2 or +2.5, than you get more noise and also some banding


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