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 Post subject: Which Camera to buy
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 1:44 pm 
Hello everyone.

I am very new to photography so I could do with some advice from the people who know what they are talking about.

I am interested in getting into stock photography. I am a Sales and Marketing Director who spends a fair amount of money on images and this area has always interested me. I always have great ideas about the kind of pictures I want, and despite there being literally millions to choose from, I am quite often unable to find what I want.

I need to buy the right equipment, but I want to tip toe into this, so I am looking at budget DSLR's. I have been reading reviews on this site and watching the excellent video reviews and I'm thinking either the Canon 1000D or the Nikon D3000.

Can anyone offer me any advice? Am I looking at the right camera's? If I am which do you think is the best option and if i'm not, what do you think a better option would be.

The camera is unlikely to be used for anything other than taking pictures of objects in a light tent.

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards

Martin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 2:46 pm 
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Location: NW England
Hi & welcome Martin.

What size `objects` are you likely to be photogaphing? (do you need Macro capabilities?)

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Image btw,He who dies with the most toys, WINS!
Nikon D800E & D700 bodies + Nikon 200-400mm F4 VR1, 50mm F1.4G, 16-35mm f/4G VR, 105 F2.8 VR macro, 70-300mm lenses. A couple of filters, Giotto tripod & ballhead. Lowepro Slingshot 302 AW
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 3:35 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 18, 2010 3:52 pm
Posts: 2177
Location: The Netherlands
If you have to choose between D3000 and 1000D, check Gordon's reviews.
He has compared them both that you can decide more simply! :)
I think for macro shots you almost need Live View, because of the small viewfinders it's hard to focus correctly.

But there's one thing I really recommend: Go to a shop and try them both.

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Ruben

Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
Tamron 17-50 2.8, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM,
Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 4:08 pm 
Hi Guys,

Thanks for your tips so far. The objects I will be shooting will be everyday objects from coins to say something like a wardrobe size object.

I am going to go to my local Jessops on the weekend and have a play around with both camera's but I suppose I really need to use one for a while to really know which is right for me and I'm sure they wont want me hanging around all day.

I have read and watched reviews on both cameras from several sources and read the comparison guides, but these don't cover what these cameras are like to live with over a period of time, so anyone who has either of these cameras with any advice would be appreciated.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 5:02 pm 
A word of caution about trying out cameras in a box store such as Jessops. Generally speaking, the cameras will be tethered to the counter and you won't get a true feel for the camera in your hands. Also -- with respect to the sales reps, you would probably do much better to go into a proper camera shop and work with a rep there -- they will be able to provide you much more meaningful advise. Stores like Jessops rarely employ true specialists -- they employ sales associates and give them product education - most of which you can get on the web on your own anyway.

Not to bad-mouth box stores -- I buy from them frequently, but when I am after proper information that I haven't been able to find on the web or otherwise, I go to specialty stores. Often they will price match the big players anyway. And if not -- once you make your decision you can buy from wherever you want.

Nothing can replace proper hands-on experience when seeking for a DSLR.

Insofar as "living with" either camera, as you are new to the DLSR world, I would suggest that no one camera is the perfect one -- you will learn to live with the Canon or the Nikon. A couple of personal observations about them -- I find that Canon tends to have more features (e.g. depth of field preview for us old school types, auto bracketing, etc.), but tends to feel more cheaply built to me. Whereas the Nikon has a nice solid feel, it hasn't got quite the same level of features as the Canon. The Nikon does have the Guide feature which is popular to newbies, however, over time as you learn the ropes, accessing the camera features directly tends to require lots of menu work -- and can become frustrating over time. Lenses are par between the two -- plenty of selection including 3rd party vendors such as Sigma, etc. The budget lens with these cameras are about equal. Not great, but fine to begin with.

As I say -- both are good entry level cameras -- and you will learn to live quite well with either. I wouldn't spend too much time deciding -- get the one which truly feels the best in your hands and seems to be most user-friendly for you. You will likely end up trading up the body over time anyway.

Don't forget to include in your budget extra funds for such things as a decent camera bag, extra memory cards, 2nd battery, tripod, rocket blower, etc. I am of the school that always adds a uv filter to all my lenses for protection purposes - I've banged up a few over time, and have saved the price of a lens by doing so. ymmv.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 5:26 pm 
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Location: NW England
Just a thought, If you're shooting something as small as coins & as large as wardrobes, maybe you would be best deciding on the lens 1st (eg Nikon or Canon) THEN the camera. Hopefully you could get away with just the 1 lens.
Price, as well as capability might be the deciding factor.

_________________
Image btw,He who dies with the most toys, WINS!
Nikon D800E & D700 bodies + Nikon 200-400mm F4 VR1, 50mm F1.4G, 16-35mm f/4G VR, 105 F2.8 VR macro, 70-300mm lenses. A couple of filters, Giotto tripod & ballhead. Lowepro Slingshot 302 AW
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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 7:09 pm 
Not a bad idea -- I suspect that the OP is probably going to want a good macro, external flash/ring light --- but not sure what the level of the budget is.

Martin -- what's your budget here?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2010 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 11:52 am
Posts: 861
Location: Surrey, UK
@jwnrw. Yes the cameras are attached to the counters, but if you ask them they will unlock it and let you have a real feel of the camera. I asked for the same reason as it was annoying having it attached and they let me. The salesperson just stood next to me whilst I tried it out. But I definitely agree with you that the salepeople in those kinds of shops do not know alot. I don't listen to them (no offence to them) just nod in politeness. :D

_________________
Camera: Canon 550D with battery grip
Lenses: Canon 24-105mm f/4L, Canon 50mm f1.4, Canon 18-55mm, Tamron 70-300mm,
Accessories: Manfrotto 055XPROB with 808RC4 head, Canon 430ex II speedlite, Lowepro Nova 180AW and Lowepro Pro Runner 450AW


Oh that is so lame, every hot girl who can aim a camera thinks she’s a photographer -Stewie Griffin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 10:02 am 
Hello All,

Thanks again for all your great advice. After listening to some of the comments on here and reading other areas of the forum, I have decided to up my budget slightly. I'm thinking around £750 and I am now leaning towards buying a second hand 450D, a light tent (or some kind of lighting solution like a soft box or something)

With regards to lenses, I have been told by a friend that is already quite successful at stock photography that the 18-55mm kit lens will probably do me as a start, but a better one may be required, so I think I will try a save a few hundred pounds of my budget and see what kind of lens that could get me.

I have been doing research into cameras, reading reviews and trying to familiarise myself with the different features I would need, but unfortunately, like a true newbie, I neglected lenses.

What do people think of the 450D? Are there any stock photographers on the forum and what lenses/cameras do you use.

I have found a local camera shop (30 miles away but localish) who sells second hand cameras as well as new and he is willing to let me have a play and give me some advice. I'm going as early as possible tomorrow morning.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 10:45 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 29, 2010 11:52 am
Posts: 861
Location: Surrey, UK
Yes definitely go to the store and see what you can find out. A friend of mine has the 450d and it is quite a good camera. However it is quite old and you can get the 500d for the same price as the 450d on amazon. The 500d is a much better camera. As for lenses it really depends what type of photography you are in to. If you want a telephoto lens go for something like the canon 55-250 or tamron 70-300. If you want to get into portraits and night photography get something like the canon 50mm 1.8/1.4. I have the 1.4 and it is a really good lens. Remember to check out Gordons best buys!

_________________
Camera: Canon 550D with battery grip
Lenses: Canon 24-105mm f/4L, Canon 50mm f1.4, Canon 18-55mm, Tamron 70-300mm,
Accessories: Manfrotto 055XPROB with 808RC4 head, Canon 430ex II speedlite, Lowepro Nova 180AW and Lowepro Pro Runner 450AW


Oh that is so lame, every hot girl who can aim a camera thinks she’s a photographer -Stewie Griffin


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 8:29 pm 
+1 on getting to that local shop. I highly doubt that you will be disappointed.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 9:26 pm 
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Posts: 9823
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Hi djmobi,

To better inform others may I ask if your £750 also has to buy your lighting, light tent and a tripod? I'm guessing that you'll be lucky to have as much as £450 left over for the camera and lens(es) but as this isn't something I've ever looked at before I could be way off in my assumptions. :?

Bob.

_________________
Olympus OM-D E-M1 + M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8, Lumix 7-14mm f/4, Leica DG Summilux 15mm f/1.7 ASPH, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8.
Leica D Vario-Elmar 14mm-150mm f/3.5 - f/5.6 ASPH.
OM-D E-M5, H-PS14042E, Gitzo GT1541T, Arca-Swiss Z1 DP ball-head.
Astrophotography: TEC 140 'scope, FLI ML16803 camera, ASA DDM60 Pro mount.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 4:06 am 
If you need lots of additional kit, I am thinking you may want to check out the used market as well.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 6:04 am 
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Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 8:57 am
Posts: 1551
Location: Winterpeg, Manisnowba, Canada
As I like to say (Look, it's in my signature!) "Bodies come and go, but glass is forever!". A camera body could last you many years, but here in the digital age, technology is updated quickly and the better IQ could make an old digital camera's images look terrible! Lenses however, do not get outdated (Besides image stabilizing and auto focus technology constantly being updated) and can be used for many many years without complaints. In fact, as of today I'm still using Nikkor AI lenses from the '70s!

Perhaps you should really focus your budget on lenses, not only will they last you longer but they're also more important to your picture. Comparing the lenses vs. the body, lenses account for 80% of the image and the body is 20%. Sure, it's important to have a body that can give you usable results at higher ISOs, but sharp fast glass is even more important.

Hope I helped!

-Evan

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-Evan

Gear: 7 Nikon Nikkor AI-S and AF-S lenses, SB-700 flash, Nikon D7000, Nikon FM, variety of accessories

"There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs."
- Ansel Adams


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2010 3:54 pm 
+2 on the value of the lenses -- but if you are a newbie, I understand the temptation of a kit as well.


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