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 Post subject: I need your help
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 2:29 am 
Hello, as you can tell this is my first post, and should be the first of many.
i enjoy this site alot and look forward to learning from all of you.

i am new to the DSLR world, and i have a few questions regarding my
choice of lenses. I have yet to settle on a body, but i do realize my
choice in lenses are very important, here is what im interested in shooting:

lots of wide landscapes. i'll want a wide angle and a faily decent zoom
alot of sports, maily soccer and hockey. 70-300mm?
and the usual portaits, family events wildlife and everyday use.
i'll be doing alot of night shooting of my city, example: Down Town
Calgary, and it's surroundings.

i'll want the very best out of my photographs, so quality is key, and
budget is no issue. i'll most likely land on a Canon body. Also i'll want
IS on my lenses as i know Canon puts that feature in their lenses and not
in their bodies?

other questions:

i have done my research, although it may not show in text, i have tried.

When should the ISO be low, and when should it be high?

thats all i can think about as of right now, but i know for a fact that i'll be
asking more.

Thank you for reading, and please, all the advice i can get will be
deeply aprechiated.

Brandon
Calgary, Canada.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:12 am 
Preferably, the ISO should be set low all of the time as this produces the best quality image. Unfortunately, this is not always possible as shooting in lower light requires a slower shutter speed and increases camera shake, the ISO can be turned up to allow the sensor to be more sensitive to light but it also increases noise.
So in short, use lowest ISO whenever possible but you do have the flexibility to turn it up to allow more hand-holdable exposures in lower light and compromise on IQ.

Hope this helps :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:48 am 
Hi Brandon.
Regarding the lenses, you should think about the weight as well, some lenses are heavy, others are lighter, and it depends how many lenses you want, maybe 2, maybe 3. This will make you change lenses more often and the need to carry all of them.

If you're interested in family pictures, wide landscape and wild life (which is what I use my camera for) you should get at least 18-200 range (which is ~28-300 after the X1.6 multiply of cropped sensor cameras like the 400D or 40D).
If you want quality (and you're talking about Canon) you should buy the L lenses or "almost L" lenses.
For example, for wide you can use the 17-55 (which I'm going to buy soon, not L but a great lens) or 17-40L. You can also get the 24-105L but it's not wide enough for wide landspaces(in my opinion), so you can add the 10-22 (again, not L but very good).
For zoom you can buy the 70-200 (with or without IS, f/2.8 or f/4), if you can afford it, buy the IS version. There is also 70-300 USM IS, not L but should be good.

Hope I helped, enjoy your shopping.
Liron.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:50 am 
Thanks, that helps alot.
after posting my initial post, i remembered the other question/s i had.
what exactly is noise? i read it over and over again but i can not come
across a straight definition...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:56 am 
Thanks Liron.

Weight is definitely not a factor in my opinion.
i'll take those into concideration.
i have read up about the L lenses, not alot but i did know they
were of better quality than the other lenses canon offeres.

Brandon


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 Post subject: Re: I need your help
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:09 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 12:06 pm
Posts: 312
Location: Seattle (Home) ~ Taipei (Work)
Brandon wrote:

i'll want the very best out of my photographs, so quality is key, and
budget is no issue.


Welcome aboard Brandon. This will be a fun post to reply to especially since you mentioned that "budget is no issue."

Lens wise I'll add the following:

Portrait work: If you are shooting full frame then the 85mm f/1.2L ($1700) is the best choice for you. If you are going to shoot on a cropped body then you might want to look at the 50mm f/1.2L ($1200) or the 24-70 f/2.8L ($1100). If IS is important to you then take a look at te 24-105 f/4L IS ($1000). For your late night shooting around Calgary take a look at the 35mm f/1.4L ($1100).

For sporting events you are going to have a few choices too. Since soccer is outdoor and lighting generally isn't and issue you would probably be happy with the 70-200 f/2.8L IS ($1500). If you really need speed and budget isn't an issue then take a look at the mighty 300mm f2.8L IS ($3800).

Since hockey will be shot indoors where lighting is more challenging then you'll need to look at some very fast primes to get the great shots. One of my all time favorite lenses is the 135mm f/2L ($900). It's a beautiful lens with incredible bokeh.

As far as ISO is concerned follow Studini's advice, always stick to the lowest possible ISO you can get away with.

You will probably get more specific answers if you can narrow down the body to either a full framed camera like the Canon 5D, or 1Ds MII, a speed demon like the 1D MIII, or a 1.6 crop body like the 40D. Have fun shopping. No budget shopping must be fun, I'm green with envy. :mrgreen:

_________________
Leica M9, Nikon D300s, Leica X1, Canon S95, Zero Image 6x9


Last edited by seattlesteve on Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:19 am 
Thanks for the reply Steve.

i have been out and about shopping and taking the advice of handling
the cameras and getting the feel for them. out of all, the Canon 40D
felt just amazing. i know it is an advanced camera and not ment for green people like me, but i am very eager to learn, as i want to excell
in photography.

thanks for your advice on the Lences, i love the responces im getting so
far. for my sports, soccer will also be shot indoors seeing as winter her
lasts for 5+ months.

if you are responding to this post, assume the lenses will be mounted on
a 40D body.

it is nice, i have saved up quite a bit and do not feel guilty about spending
what i have. plus i will be doing lots of traveling in the near future, so
im really excited.

Brandon


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:28 am 
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Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi Brandon, I'll add my welcome here!

Noise in camera terms refers to the speckled effect you see on photos taken at higher sensitivities. It's a bit like the grain in high-speed film. You can see examples of this on the noise results pages of all our reviews, and also in the Gallery pages.

Subjectively noise is seen as a bad thing, so manufacturers are always trying to reduce it - appropriately enough with noise reduction software. Most NR software basically smudges the image to reduce the speckled effect, but at the cost of losing the finest detail - that's the balance they have to weigh up, although better NR is possible with software on your computer, so we always penalise cameras which don't let you turn it off, or at least minimise its own NR.

Electronic noise is present in every signal so the trick is to make sure the signal is bigger. That's what people are talking about when they discuss the signal to noise ratio. Cameras with bigger sensors are more sensitive to light and therefore produce a bigger signal with less noise - that's why DSLRs suffer from much less noise than compacts.

We have a good illustration of this difference here:

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon ... oise.shtml

Believe it or not, a typical DSLR sensor could have ten times the surface area of a compact sensor! And full frame DSLRs have sensors with twice the surface area of normal DLRs.

So if low noise is important to you, get a DSLR every time. Their noise levels will still increase as the ISO gets bigger, but much less so than a compact. And that's really important for sports photography because you'typically ll be shooting in low light at fast shutter speeds, which means having to increase the ISO sensitivity to cope.

Hope that helps!

Gordon


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:36 am 
Thanks Gordon for your reply.

Quote:
So if low noise is important to you, get a DSLR every time. Their noise levels will still increase as the ISO gets bigger, but much less so than a compact. And that's really important for sports photography because you'typically ll be shooting in low light at fast shutter speeds, which means having to increase the ISO sensitivity to cope.


that makes alot of sense, thanks!

do you have anything to add to steves post regarding my lense problem?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:57 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 12:06 pm
Posts: 312
Location: Seattle (Home) ~ Taipei (Work)
Starting with a fresh slate and a 40D I'll suggest this lens setup:

Canon 40D
    35mm f/1.4L (good walk around and low light lens)
    50mm f/1.2L (your portrait lens)
    135mm f/2L (indoor sports lens)
    70-200 f/2.8L IS (outdoor sports and some portrait work)
    24-105 f/4L IS (another good walk around lens that can also be used for some portrait work) This is the lens that sits on my camera most of the time.
    EF-S 10-22 (good for landscape work)


Don't forget to add the 580EX II flash to round out your system.

I've dropped the 85mm f/1.2L and the 300mm f2.8L IS from the list because the 40D will give you an equivalent reach that equals those two lenses. Effectively the 50mm becomes and 80mm and the 200mm becomes 320mm.

This is a dream setup for many and would keep you happy for many many years. It's fun to spend other people's money.

**Keep in mind that there will be as many different opinions about this as there are lens combinations. :lol:

_________________
Leica M9, Nikon D300s, Leica X1, Canon S95, Zero Image 6x9


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 7:08 am 
Quote:
This is a dream setup for many and would keep you happy for many many years. It's fun to spend other people's money.


HAHAHA. i hear you.

i doubt i'll go out and slam money in one day.
but i'll definitely have a collection before the new year.

now Steve, if you could only have one for your portraits, one for your
landscapes and one for your sports, what would your line up loo like?

i really like what i hear about the 35mm f/1.4L and the 24-105 f/4L IS


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:06 am 
Hi Brandon.
The 40D is a dream.... I wish I could buy it now :(
The 35 and 24-105 sound great (I'm not into prime since I like my kit to be light when I travel), but you're missing sports (if you are far away) and wide landscape.
I think you should consider to add the 10-22 for wide scenes and the 70-200L f/2.8 IS for tele (if needed).

And Steve, I agree, it is fun to spend other people money... :D
Liron.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 6:31 pm 
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Joined: Sun Nov 05, 2006 11:08 pm
Posts: 7972
Location: Germany
Brandon. An excellent 3 lens set-up would be
- 10-22mm
- 50mm
- 70-200mm

_________________
Thomas (beware: Nikon-fanboy and moderator!) My Lens Reviews, My Pictures, My Photography Blog
D800+assorted lenses


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 9:55 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9975
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hey Brandon, you'll make my day if you're thinking of buying any of this stuff through our affiliate stores! See this page:

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Affil ... ping.shtml

Wherever you end up getting it though, the guys have suggested some great kit. Couple the 40D with a nice fast lens and you'll have a great setup for your sports photography...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2007 12:33 pm 
Hey Liron.

it felt amazing in my hands, and i got to play around with it for a bit.
so that was good, of course before a salesman dawned the look of
"he's going to drop it, i know it"

i really dont mind traveling with the extra weight, i know for some it's
a huge concern but for me, i really couldnt care less.

now if im considering the 35mm and the 50mm, what exactly's so
different between those two lenses, besides the obvious 15mm?
what will/can the 35 shoot and not the 50, vica versa.

and what exactly do the measurments of "so and so mm" mean?
why do some lenses present just a single number (35mm) and other two
(70-200mm)?

also i am very curious to when/why some people use a slow shutter
speed and sometimes a fast one. whats the difference between the two.
what will a slow shutter speed do for you that a fast one wont, again
vica versa. of course sports is shot at the fastest, there's no need to
cover that.

thanks for your input Thomas, i will definitely be picking up a 70-200
when i get around to my sports photography. that was my main attraction.
and why i have chose the 40D, 6.5 frames per second...

and Gordon i will deeply consider buying my gear from one of your
affiliate sites.


Any answers to the questions i have asked will be greatly aprechiated.
thank you so much.

Brandon


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