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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:31 am 
Hi

I recently got D90 and have 2 lenses , 18-105 mm kit lens and 70-300mm lens.

I am planning to buy some UV filters to protect my lens from dust and scratches. Which one do you recommend ?

I did some research and found Quantaray and Hoya Multicoated filters.
How is Quantaray ?

(Nikon is too expensive :)

By the way, do you recommend to use UV filter on 70-300mm lens ? Will it bring any negative effect in quality of the pictures ?

Your suggestion will be highly appreciated. Thanks...


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 5:10 am 
Don't really know.
I am using a b+w uv filter on my 18-200vr
I use it for protection of the font element more than anything.

There are some that argue that you don't need a UV filter on a lens because the lens already has coatings. (again, I don't know for sure)
but here's a link
http://www.lenstip.com/113.1-article-UV ... _test.html
I bought my filter before i found this link


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 8:57 am 
There are many photographers, both pro and amateur alike, that will either hate or love the idea of UV filters. Each side have valid points and should be considered when you yourself decide which way to fall on this one.

Those who like them will say that they offer a small level of protection for their front lens element. There also may be some very small visual benefit to the outcome of your image, although this does not come with some drawbacks as well, as I will mention below.

Those who don't like them will argue, "Why pay $1,000 for a lens just to put a cheap piece of glass on the end?" By adding another layer of glass, it is conceivable that it may deteriorate the quality of your image. This may include vignetting or even enhanced minor "ghosting" from light bouncing of the lens' front element, striking the filter, and re-entering lens.

My take on it is this...if protection is your main concern, consider always shooting with your lens hood on. Do this even when indoors or when the lighting situation may not necessarily call for it. The lens hood will provide a secondary measure of protection by itself. Also note, that worse case scenario, you do damage your front element, it is one of the cheapest parts of the lens to repair. What you have to consider is how you weigh the difference in adding an UV filter for protection with the risk of a worse image, or having that extra level of protection. If you do decide that they are right for you, I would strongly recommend purchasing one that is glass, not plastic. When I use a filter, I like Hoya. B+W are also very popular as well.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:03 pm 
hmmm...ok
which one do you recommend to go between hoya and quantaray ?

Also do you recommend filter for 70-300mm lens ?


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 2:04 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 7:59 pm
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Location: west coast of Norway
i'd say get Hoya filters for both your lenses

you know, an UV filter is easily replaced, not so with the front lens element:)

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 4:30 pm 
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Location: The Netherlands
Get an Hoya multicoated filter. Not very expensive, and does not really degrade your imagequality. Also the multicoating prevents additional flare caused by the filter.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 7:33 pm 
I would go with nothing but Hoya and B+W. So, if your deciding between Hoya and Quantaray, I'd recommend Hoya.

I use Hoya Pro1D filters. I've had great luck with them.

Yes, filters are certainly easier to replace. But, for those where every pixel counts, some look past the slight image degrading that may be caused by some filters. That's all.


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