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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 12:21 am 
hello every one,
There has been a lot of depate going on as i met a person who works for Kodak and they are telling every one that One can not see above 4800DPI.. so i though to place a topic here to get the word out and we can have healthy discussion regarding this topic..

When printing we need to keep following things in mind.
1. Megapixels
2. PPI (pixels per Inches)
3. DPI (Drop per inches)

1. Megapixles is the resolution of your camera Mega stands for Million
2. PPI is the number of Pixels per inches.. This value has its limit up to 300PPI when we reffer to Inkjet printers
3. DPI the drops placed per inch.

The term DPI is often used interchangably with PPI, causing a lot of confusion, however, DPI refers to the resolution of the printing device, where PPI refers to the resolution of the image itself.

Now, Many people say you can not see above 300PPI. many printers have offered high DPI, the printers with high DPI values like 4800dpi or with canon 9600dpi refers to how smooth your image will be.. Printers places to many droplets to show one particular pixel in its certain colour..
so, the higher the number is the more smoother the picture would look..

Now, many companies also says that havig so many droplets may just overlap one another at that certain square inch.. Apparantely on all the printers boxes you can see the droplet size the printer is producing, with EPSON its 1.6pl (pl stands for Pico litre) with canon its 1pl.. HP with certain printers uses 2pl.. so these small droplets dont really overlap one another.. and saves ink consumption as well in one sence..

on a 8MP DSLR i can print up to A3 easily.. which is 11.7 x 16.9 "
3264 x 2448 10.88" x 8.16" from 300 PPI..

3264/300 = 10.88
2448/300 = 8.16

We can print bigger size by Resizing our pixels using softwares like Adobe photoshop..

Hope this article would have helped you..:)


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 8:29 am 
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Bonjour h.akbar13,

Thanks for the explanations.

I'm currently using a Samsung SPP-2040 which uses thermal sublimation rated at 300 x 300 DPI. The quality of the print-outs is as good as those obtained with my hp 980cxi ink-jet printer rated at 2 400 x 1 200 DPI.

Is there a link between resolution and printing technology (thermal sublimation and ink-jet) :?:

Best regards,

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 9:35 am 
This thread got me very intrested indeed, after beeing to alot of the photoshops around my town to get my photos printed i have been very disapoitned with the prints that i have gotten, they been extremly blurry! And i dont knw why! now i have the HP Photosmart 3310 along with the Nikond D40x and shooting in RAW which i later convert into jpeg, now i was wonderng what would be the optimal size for getting a bit larger prints then normal ones then 15cm x 10cm? and how would i optimise the image for a print? and i have no idea how to print images on this printer i hvae tried but failed really badly! does anyone have experience with this printer?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:31 am 
There could be a difference in printing because of your workflow.

I sharpen my images a little more than necessary if I'm printing to get better results in a separate TIFF. I keep another TIFF for viewing on monitors which is unsharpened.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:42 am 
What do you mean by diffrence in my workflow, i never printed digital images on prtiners before and i m the ultimate amature when it comes to this topic!

When you say a little more what on average are we talking about here, my guess is that you have perfected it towards the printer that you mainly use?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:58 am 
By workflow, I refer to everything that happens after the photo has been taken.

I strictly colour manage the work I do, and I've multiple calibrated monitors to help with this, and the workspace is set to different printer profiles - each profile will be for different machines and even if it is the same machine, for different paper types. So the end printed result will be identical (or as close to) as what I saw on my monitor.

As for sharpening, the amount you need before you print depends on your original image. Of course in some instances where you've gone for a soft effect, sharpening really isn't needed.

So you've got to perfect it for the printer, for your image, and ultimately for the eye.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:01 am 
Allright, the calibration tool you were talkign about on that PM you sent me a while back!

This is really intresting to know, i bet alot of people out there that are not fully aware of this just print thier images and end up with a totaly diffrent result from what they see on the screen. Now this is a nice base for me to start with and to read on some more on it!


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:05 am 
The Canon iP4500 is print on is the first printer I've ever used for photo printing, at 9600dpi and printing on 4x6", I still need to sharpen. I dunno if that's a fact of photo printing or a limitation of the circumstances and hardware.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:08 am 
From experience, sharpening is necessary for printing (for most part, but is dependent on what your image is); it isn't necessarily down to equipment limitation, though the degree of sharpening needed goes down with higher end printers.

I'm hoping there'll be other voices to echo this and to add to what I've inputted.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:16 am 
Quote:
I'm currently using a Samsung SPP-2040 which uses thermal sublimation rated at 300 x 300 DPI. The quality of the print-outs is as good as those obtained with my hp 980cxi ink-jet printer rated at 2 400 x 1 200 DPI.

Is there a link between resolution and printing technology (thermal sublimation and ink-jet)


Hello rei_vilo,
Due to reason you have a di sublimation printer. These printers work a little different from the Ink jet printers, These printers can produce a Pixel of any particular colour. The inkjet printers in terms to produce that particular pixel colour have to place so many dots and give an impression of that colour.
The quality as you have mentioned is the same as the Ink jet printers when we print the size of image up to 4x6", at this size of image from our usual viewing distance we can not recognise the resolution difference.. No wonder di sublimation process was introduced in a easy to carry around Portable photo printers :)..


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:32 am 
The dye-sub method of "layering" the colours ensures better gradation and tones and as a result, they do not need such fine ink droplets. A 300x300 dye-sub printer is equivalent to an inkjet of much higher resolution.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:58 am 
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Location: France
Bonjour h.akbar13 and grahamnp,

Thank you very much for your explanations :) .

The Samsung SPP-2040 is indeed very compact and handy. I carry it on family gatherings and give prints just after taking the pictures. At less than 30 cents per print, it's affordable too.

Best regards,

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 01, 2008 12:14 pm 
Just want to share something here about the Photosmart 3310

After fideling around a bit with these images i ended up printing two images, and i realised that iamge prints the images a bit darker that means my montior is a bit too bright right? Ed?

I printed 10x15cm or 4x6 in if you will, and the results where really good compared to the prints that i obtined in the photo store (shocker eh!) didnt really expect that! There is great detail in the images and i think i knw how the crop of the printer works now! which is great now i just gotta do a lill sharpening and i think i m good to go!

FUNFACT: i tried to print this image and i coudnt, and i was like WOW, didnt really knw that. Seems as if the HP printers sensor when your prtining bills and it doesnt let you, all i got on a print was part of the image and then a URL. A url whcih i checked out of course and i came across teh rule of prtinig bills and about forgin them...i bet none of yall knew that one :)


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 7:58 am 
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Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:39 pm
Posts: 601
Location: France
Bonjour,

I posted a review of the :arrow: Samsung SPP-2040 Printer .

Enjoy :)

_________________
--- rei_vilo
Pentax K-5 + BG4 + DA* 16-50 + DA* 50-135 + DA* 60-250 + AF-540FGZ
reivilophotography.weebly.com


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 2:18 pm 
You should also make sure you are using a colour space for printed media. If you are going to print your images don't use the sRGB colour space. By default most photo editors use this colour space, but it is meant for images destined to be displayed on the web. You should be using either Adobe RGB (1998) or Pro Photo RGB. These have a wider colour gamut and are more capable of rendering accurate visible colour. sRGB is narrowed because most browsers can't render the visible gamut. The correct ICC profile for the paper you are printing will also help in accurate colour printing.


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