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 Post subject: Southern Cross
PostPosted: Sat Apr 13, 2013 10:24 am 
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Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2006 7:01 am
Posts: 1153
Location: bit east of Melbourne
was camped in the Little Desert on a recent family trip away.
Aside from sitting around the campfire and watching the possums, the sky was quite amazing.

have never done star photography before and tried a few different things. Wished I had read the tutorial earlier all my shots with the 85 prime were at 20-30sec exposure and the stars had moved. Did get some good shot with the 30 Sigma.
viewtopic.php?t=206

just curious when pp these sort of photos, what do you look for. Any tips

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IMG_8428jpg by maxjj, on Flickr

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Southern Cross with Pointers taken in Little Desert National Park by maxjj, on Flickr

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 Post subject: Re: Southern Cross
PostPosted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 7:52 pm 
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Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
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Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Nice photos! Do you mean post-process by PP? If so, then I think a lot of simple astro-photography is about getting the colours you want, which may mean darkening the sky (or reducing light pollution), turning the Moon more grey than yellow, that sort of thing. More advanced astro-photogs go for accuracy, may reduce bright star sizes, that sort of thing.

Keep going!


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 Post subject: Re: Southern Cross
PostPosted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 1:19 am 
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Location: bit east of Melbourne
thanks Gordon, I was using LR and noticed that sharpening, masking and noise reduction was causing stars to disappear. Its not like processing photos of birds. :D
Now that I have read the tutorial and have a better understanding of focal length and exposure time, I am keen to have another go. Its a different technique than what I am used to. There is something special about seeing all the stars when camping out in the middle of nowhere, away from light pollution.
Focusing in the dark, in manual wasn`t easy, I think next time I might prefocus in daylight on a far object and tape up the focus ring or mark it somehow.

The first pic is the jpg, the second was raw and then using daylight for awb and a few tweaks. Just couldn`t find tweaks in LR that actually made the picture better.

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 Post subject: Re: Southern Cross
PostPosted: Sat Apr 27, 2013 9:23 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 13, 2010 7:01 pm
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Location: NW England
Excellent pics. 8)

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 Post subject: Re: Southern Cross
PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2013 1:23 pm 
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Location: Maribor, Slovenia
Very nice shot!
Is that really just a single exposure?

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 Post subject: Re: Southern Cross
PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 1:07 pm 
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Joined: Sat Aug 31, 2013 5:44 am
Posts: 2
Location: western australia
Wow, these r great shots! Im right into astronomy and got my first dslr last month as im going to get into astrophotography and i have to say that yr pics are as good, if not better then any i've seen in the astronomy groups and forums im in. Yr processing looks as good as some of the pro astrphotographers i also talk to, so definately keep going! With trying to see yr camera in the dark you should look at getting a red light torch. Even red cellaphane over the end of a normal torch works. That way u can see what yr doing and not ruin yr night vision. Cool pics! :)


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