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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 9:11 am 
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Youre looking at the wrong place in the sky! :lol:
There are thousands of nebulae, but this one is in Orion, in the sword. You can easily see it with the naked eye :wink:

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Ruben

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 12:08 pm 
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If you want to avoid star trails you need a tracking mount or short exposures. But short exposures don't really cut it.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 5:10 pm 
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But with a good DSLR and high ISO you can take without tracking a beautiful picture of M42.
Just set the camera to ISO 6400 or higher, choose the fastest (tele)lens you have, and shoot with an exposure until you get startrails. Shoot then at least 100 pics, stack them in DSS and show us! :wink:

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Ruben

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 6:35 pm 
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Unfotunately, with the exception of M42 probably, shot exposures are not going to cut it on nebulas as they are very feint. As you get more into astroimaging you will also realise that every photon counts (btw a name of a very good book for getting into astroimaging) as you will be able to capture more detail and colour, and when we consider the millions of lightyears light from galaxy and nebula take to travel across the skies capturing every photon is crucial.

Still we all have to start somewhere go give some short exposures a go and see what happens.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 01, 2011 8:06 pm 
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Yes Lee, I meant M42 :wink:
Some of the Messier objects are big and bright enough to capture with very short exposures, like the doublecluster which isnt a Messier to be fair!

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Ruben

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:15 pm 
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Indeed they are Ruben but Don.Homer was originally talking about nebula, for which longer exposures are necessary.

There are a wealth of objects out there with which you can get away with short exposures, the key is to learn your way around the sky, pick an object and try it out, as they say, practice makes perfect.

:) :)

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 1:45 pm 
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Ive taken beautiful pictures of both M31 and M42 with a camera on tripod. M31 was taken with the 135 f/2,8 @ f/2,8, so if you have a fast tele, I can recommend to try it.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:11 pm 
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Just to avoid any confusions M31 is a galaxy and M42 is a nebula.

Depending on what you want to shoot you will have to tailor your exposure to suit. For example, M42 can take a combination of 5min exposures down to 30sec exposures to prevent the core from being burned out. Globular clusters such as M13 may require relatively short exposures but the veil nebula, for example, will require considerably longer exposures.

To help Don.Homer out a bit more he needs to take multiple exposures and combine together to increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for an image thus revealing more detail with less noise. On a fixed tripod the length of exposure will depend on the part of the sky you are focussing on and the focal length used.

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