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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 9:56 am 
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Hi

For my birthday I got the Meade DS 2080 computerised refractor telescope 800mm f/10 lens: 80 mm

I have bought the T-addapter, so I can fit my canon EOS camera on to it, and I have taken some pretty good pictures of the moon. I have seen Saturn, but I couldn't get a picture.
My first thought after seeing Saturn was "Wow, thats amazing, I'm going to need a larger telescope".

I have always been facinated by astronomy, space etc, but looking at stars I honestly don't know anything. I feel that I could get much more out of it
I have spent days Google'ing, looking at astronomy sites etc and I still can't find answers to some pretty basic questions. I have also read the string about astrophotography, but it has been overclouded for a week now. My best shots were black with some dots, but I might try some of the tips when the weather is on my side.
So my questions are:

- Will a canon extender x2 fit on to it, and will it be a good idea to do so?

- What else would I be abel to find and perhaps photograph on the night skies?

- And is there a guide to what you can see, because at the moment the night skies are just a black sheet with shiny dots. So what is there to see?

Michael


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 12:07 pm 
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Hi Michael,

Congratulations on the new 'scope.

I only dabble these days but as an alternative to a Canon 2x Extender (I'm assuming you don't have one already) you might consider a Meade TeleXtender. I don't have any Meade kit so you'll need to do your own research regarding compatibility.

As for a guide, maybe something like the Sky & Telescope This Week's Sky at a Glance page. Excellent magazine, by the way.

Bob.

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Olympus OM-D E-M1 + M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8, Lumix 7-14mm f/4, Leica DG Summilux 15mm f/1.7 ASPH, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8.
Leica D Vario-Elmar 14mm-150mm f/3.5 - f/5.6 ASPH.
OM-D E-M5, H-PS14042E, Gitzo GT1541T, Arca-Swiss Z1 DP ball-head.
Astrophotography: TEC 140 'scope, FLI ML16803 camera, ASA DDM60 Pro mount.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 2:36 pm 
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WIth an 800mm ''lens'' Saturn is easy to photograph. The problem is, the field of view is a bit small with a camera mounted on the scope, do you see Saturn in the viewfinder?

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Ruben

Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 5:41 pm 
In case you haven't got it already planetarium software should help you to find what you can see from your location.

As it happens two days ago I 'stumbled upon' a PDF from the book Astronomy: A Self-Teaching Guide which I skimmed through and seems nice. I think it's scandalous Amazon charges more for the Kindle e-book version than for the paper version even if it's only 10 cents ($13.67 vs. $13.57). An e-book has no added cost of production and logistics of the physical book so it should be (a lot) cheaper.

Ben
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:50 pm 
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Well it's a while ago since I tried with Saturn, but all i got was very blurry and you could hardly see the shape, but setting the focus is a bit hard in a small viewfinder.
I've wanted to give it a try, but it has been cloudy for a while. It's always cloudy here.
When I get a bright night, and I find Saturn, then I will try again.

I saw a video where GL put a x2 extender on a canon 40 d and on to a T-ring, and onto a telescope, so I guess it will be ok.



M


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:31 pm 
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As for the links it was just what I was looking for.
Thanks mates
:wink:


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:42 pm 
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I read the astrophoto made easy thread.
So as I understand you take 3-4 long exposiures and put them on top of each other, to get a picture of a planet?
The same for the pictures of the night skies?

When I have photographed the moon, I only do one exposiure, but the light is much brighter.


M


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:58 pm 
Are you already familiar with Deep Sky Stacker? I haven't checked whether it's mentioned in that thread.

Ben
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 19, 2010 9:18 pm 
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Will I be abel to get a picture of Saturn with it's rings, and other things you only see on Discovery Channel. Offcourse it is an ameteur scope, so they won't be the same quality as the Hubble space telescope.


M


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 12:04 am 
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This is an example of an attempt I got with a slightly bigger scope (1325mm f/13) and probably with 2x barlow. A barlow is essentially the teleconverter/extender of the scope world. Exact settings and technique are posted somewhere in these forums.

I'm not sure if camera teleconverters/extenders are too happy working without a lens. At least, if I connect the sigma teleconverter without lens attached it usually complains of a lens malfunction.

With that scope on planets, you will be operating in the diffraction limited region. That is, beyond a point however much you magnify it, it will get bigger but softer (assuming you have done all else as well as possible). At that point, if you want to get much better images, a bigger scope is the thing to look at.

Image

I'm by no means anywhere near "good" but seeing conditions are the biggest limit I face where I am.

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:44 am 
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Quote:
Will I be abel to get a picture of Saturn with it's rings, and other things you only see on Discovery Channel. Offcourse it is an ameteur scope, so they won't be the same quality as the Hubble space telescope.


NOO!
That's really NOT possible! Watch out! Astrophotography is a nice hobby, but many stop because they hang their camera on the scope, dont get Hubble images (or even good tracked star point photos) and stop. Only after years and years of practising, you will be able to make a photo like this: http://www.google.nl/imgres?imgurl=http://foto.astronomy.cz/AstroForum/M27.jpg&imgrefurl=http://qhyccd.com/ccdbbs/index.php%3FPHPSESSID%3Dc5c46b7709921963aa1eb5a0594af9a4%26topic%3D313.0;prev_next%3Dprev&usg=__eeftfF7R9N2cpQ5arQl20Ptjqu0=&h=1982&w=2973&sz=1789&hl=nl&start=12&zoom=0&tbnid=ZWoBC3FH6-__yM:&tbnh=100&tbnw=150&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dastro%2Bfoto%2Bdeepsky%2Bastroforum%26hl%3Dnl%26biw%3D1024%26bih%3D653%26gbv%3D2%26tbs%3Disch:10,713&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=358&vpy=167&dur=299&hovh=100&hovw=150&tx=63&ty=81&ei=hvSWTMqdEsneOKOSpIkJ&oei=fPSWTPKeAsmgOLSq7YgJ&esq=2&page=2&ndsp=14&ved=1t:429,r:6,s:12&biw=1024&bih=653

BTW, try your camera first piggyback on your scope. Make an exposure of 1 minute, and choose (if stars are points) every time more mm on your lenses.

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Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 9:10 am 
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Piggyback?
I don't understand, by adding mm, the lens/scope is fixed
Do you mean as focusing?
Or shutterspeed?


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:39 pm 
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Piggyback is a camera on the scope. http://www.google.nl/imgres?imgurl=http://www.company7.com/questar/graphics/que3.5piggyback667500.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.company7.com/questar/products/quest35piggy.html&usg=__k-vhqIEjBJOSiZtLMafPVKJK4YM=&h=500&w=667&sz=340&hl=nl&start=0&zoom=1&tbnid=zaL9ezsHRJJOTM:&tbnh=151&tbnw=221&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dpiggyback%2Btelescope%26um%3D1%26hl%3Dnl%26rlz%3D1C1CHNG_nlNL324NL324%26biw%3D1024%26bih%3D617%26tbs%3Disch:1&um=1&itbs=1&iact=hc&vpx=519&vpy=91&dur=535&hovh=166&hovw=221&tx=142&ty=110&ei=X3GXTIXrFOOTOKijtYgJ&oei=X3GXTIXrFOOTOKijtYgJ&esq=1&page=1&ndsp=13&ved=1t:429,r:2,s:0

You add a standard lens to your camera (fe 18-55 or 50mm) and put them on the scope. If you have tele lenses, nice! But first the shorter lenses. It needs much practicing to get images without startrails. Because of that, youll need to start with the shortest focal lenghts.

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Panasonic DMC-FZ18, Panasonic DMC-FZ28, Canon G5, Canon 350D, Canon 50D + BG-E2N
Tamron 17-50 2.8, Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L USM,
Canon 18-55 II plus lots of Minolta MD/M42 lenses and bodies


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 10:37 pm 
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So I use the scope to aim the camera with?

Then I don't get a lot of tele.

Is the purpuse to have the scope track with the stars, so they stay as dots and not as lines because they move across the skies - don't know the correct word for it.

Any suggestions for a good motive for this tecnique?

I'm looking foreward to trying it

Overclouded again tonight...


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:55 am 
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Hi Michael,

The phrase you are looking for is "equatorial mount" (Wiki). By having the main axis (the one nearest to your pier/tripod) parallel with the Earth's rotational axis it's relatively straightforward to drive that axis at a rate which cancels out the Earth's rotation.

It's also possible to track the stars with an altazimuth mount but both axes have to be driven and, for complete accuracy, the sensor also has to be rotated during tracking if you are imaging. Some of the professional observatories use this technique but it's hardly worth the cost and complexity for most amateurs.

Bob.

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Olympus OM-D E-M1 + M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8, Lumix 7-14mm f/4, Leica DG Summilux 15mm f/1.7 ASPH, M.Zuiko Digital 45mm 1:1.8, M.Zuiko Digital ED 75mm 1:1.8.
Leica D Vario-Elmar 14mm-150mm f/3.5 - f/5.6 ASPH.
OM-D E-M5, H-PS14042E, Gitzo GT1541T, Arca-Swiss Z1 DP ball-head.
Astrophotography: TEC 140 'scope, FLI ML16803 camera, ASA DDM60 Pro mount.


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