Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Wed Jul 30, 2014 6:03 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2009 3:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:31 am
Posts: 296
If you want to really get into AP, long exposure, Deep space object and nebula, you need to at least consider spending between 2000 and 3000$. I also learn that most people who start on a smaller scale often regret their choice and upgrade their equipment shortly after.

Ok. This is the thing you need to really get started :

- 8'' scope is consider the minimum to really get started in DSO.
- A GEM ( Germain Equatorial mount) : CG5, NEQ5, NEQ6. just to name a few
- A guide scope like Orion ShortTube 80-T Refractor Telescope.
- a CCD Webcame for autoguiding like the Orion Starshoot Autoguider.
- T ring adapter/mount
- Different power eyepiece (10mm, 25mm, 42mm)
- O-III and LP Filter.
- Focal Reducer
- Bathinov Mask (you can make your own)
- Dew Shield
- Laptop to run PhD, DSLRShutter, EOS Utility (Canon)
- PowerTank or a Deep cycle battery to power the mount, webcam and laptop

This is only consider the minimum. As you can see it can be quite a list. If you are not willing to make that commitment then my advice is to only consider planetary imagery with short exposure. The trouble is once you start doing AP, you won't want to stop at the moon.

Note : I haven't mention anything about Solar AP. This require an H-ALPHA filter. I am not sure if it's necessary but I will go ahead and mention it :

DO NOT EVER POINT DIRECTLY ANY EQUIPMENT TOWARDS THE SUN. THIS COULD DAMAGE YOUR EQUIPMENT. DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY A THE SUN AS THIS MIGHT CAUSE PERMANENT DAMAGE LEADING TO BLINDNESS.

_________________
Canon T2i (550D)- Tamron 17-50 F2.8 Non-VC, Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM, Canon EF-S 55-250mm F4.5-F5.6
http://www.astronomyphotography.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2009 9:48 pm 
very informative post...just a couple questions...

- would a beginner really need all the above equipment or only the important ones...if so, which ones of these would you consider the most important? (considering that the results are not the best quality, but acceptable)

- most decent telescopes start out at about $100-200+...for moon and planetary photos, would these telescopes mount with the same T mount to a dslr? or is every telescope different? (requiring different T mounts)


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2009 10:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 12:48 pm
Posts: 8022
Location: UK
The T-mount is just a mount. You need a T-ring to suit your camera, and either a generic eyepiece adapter or something dedicated for the scope. My scope lets me connect to the back with a specific adapter, but I've taken to using the eyepeice adapter as I can then use a barlow for more magnification.

As for scope size, it's kinda like lenses really. You can make do with smaller to a degree, but it is a trade off between brightness, focal length and resolvable detail compared to bigger ones.

I'm not sure how good a simple (not guided) track is as I never even got that far, but guiding seems needed for very long exposures.

If you get serious, I can imagine spending that much money and even more. I'm sure I haven't got the maximum potential out of my little scope yet so I'm going to hold out before going large as much as I'd like one.

_________________
Canon DSLRs: 7D, 5D2, 1D, 600D, 450D full spectrum, 300D IR mod
Lenses: EF 35/2, 50/1.8, 85/1.8, 135/2+SF, 28-80 V, 70-300L, 100-400L, TS-E 24/3.5L, MP-E 65, EF-S 15-85 IS
3rd party: Zeiss 2/50 makro, Samyang 8mm fisheye, Sigma 150 macro, 120-300 f/2.8 OS, Celestron 1325/13
Tinies: Sony HX9V.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2009 10:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:31 am
Posts: 296
I would say that it's preferable for any exposure longer then 30sec. You can replace the Orion Autoguider by an off-axis guider but that would mean that you would have to manually operate the mount and keep the crosshair on your target.

You can get away with a 6" telescope but the 40% more light gathering the 8"" makes a big difference. I would stay away from any telescope at the 100-200$ range. They usely have very poor optic which add vignetting/chromatic abboration. You don't need to buy an Orion 80 scope but having it makes the autoguiding software (PHD) easier to keep track of your target. That means longer exposure without drifting.

Don't forget we are talking about AP here not observing. This is an whole different subject. It's very much like DSLR lens, the more you pay, the more you get.

_________________
Canon T2i (550D)- Tamron 17-50 F2.8 Non-VC, Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM, Canon EF-S 55-250mm F4.5-F5.6
http://www.astronomyphotography.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 26, 2009 10:23 pm 
alright thanks for the info guys...gonna take a long time to save up for a decent scope and thats if i decide to get serious lol :roll:


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 5:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:31 am
Posts: 296
Didn't mean to be a hope crusher. You don't have to buy everything all at once. This is a pretty expensive hobby. If you only want to shoot the moon, you can get away with it with less then 500$ in equipment. I think Gordon had a great video that show how to do it.

I just spend 1700$ on my equipment and I still need to spend another 1000$ before I can really say I am geared up to capture DSO (Deep Space Object). Filter can get pretty expensive. Different nebula emits different wavelength. So you cannot buy 1 filter and expect to catch everything with it. Filter can vary from 80-300$.

I think the best thing you can do is invest 50$ in a book before making any purchased. This is a really good book : http://www.astropix.com/GADC/INTRO.HTM

_________________
Canon T2i (550D)- Tamron 17-50 F2.8 Non-VC, Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM, Canon EF-S 55-250mm F4.5-F5.6
http://www.astronomyphotography.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 27, 2009 5:40 pm 
yes...gotta take it step by step

i feel that after a while, i may get tired taking the same moon shots without any significant difference in quality...apart from a full moon, half moon, crescent moon and gibbous moon, there isnt really much to photograph the moon

deep space is kinda different...theres always something new to photograph

maybe joining a local astronomy club would be sufficient...ill have to consider at least giving it a try :P


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 2:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:31 am
Posts: 296
If you become a member of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, you can burrow telescope for 1 month at the time . It only cost 70$ for a year. Plus you will get to meet plenty of astronomy enthusiast. You cannot go wrong. head to www.rasc.ca

_________________
Canon T2i (550D)- Tamron 17-50 F2.8 Non-VC, Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM, Canon EF-S 55-250mm F4.5-F5.6
http://www.astronomyphotography.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 4:19 am 
thanks symtex...$70/year is not bad at all...will definitely join it sometime :P


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 3:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:31 am
Posts: 296
I got my new telescope last night. I will have some picture in the next month or so

_________________
Canon T2i (550D)- Tamron 17-50 F2.8 Non-VC, Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM, Canon EF-S 55-250mm F4.5-F5.6
http://www.astronomyphotography.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 4:27 pm 
congrats! :P


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:27 pm
Posts: 404
Location: Bristol, UK
This is a very useful thread and I echo the list of items here. I am about to start out into AP after a long period of research. A bare minimum should be a decent mount, decent sized scope and power tank. These should get you going on AP (along with a camera and adaptor of course). In addition to this my general findings have basically been the following:

Buy the best mount you can afford, however consider what you plan to do in the future. For example I am planning to get the EQ6 Pro Synscan, its only £70 more than the Syntrek and has full GoTo. Whilst I may not want GoTo to begin with it can cost several hundred pounds to upgrade later so this is the cheaper way of ensuring I am future proor.

Buy the sturdiest mount you can afford. The mount I am planning to get has a very large load capacity so in the future I know I can upgrade my scope (I plan to use my existing scope to start off with) and I know I can add an additional guide scope / CCD with overstraining the mount. You never hear anyone complain that their tripod or mount is too sturdy!!!

I have read reviews and seen images taken with the HEQ5 and EQ6 Pro and syntrek mounts all unguided at about 2min exposures so autoguiding isn't essential to start out with but may become essential once you get into it and really hunt for those DSO's. Also the mounts I list are only one brand, there are lots of different brands out there that make the same type of mount so shop around and ask questions.

It is really useful to ensure your mount tracks and compensates for the earths rotation (sidereal) which most of the mid to high range mounts will do. Lower end mounts can be adapted with motor drives to add this function but the motors then tend to be external and open to the element. Tracking mounts then require the need for a powertank if you are away from a power source. Again in the future this can be used to power your laptop should you want to autoguide with it or look into things like the EQMOD project.

Once you get into it seriously you can then think about the little items such as high quality eye pieces, flatteners, barlows etc.

The way I plan to do it is buy the mount to use my existing scope - which should be adequate to begin with. Upgrade my eyepieces to higher quality pieces. Upgrade my scope to a larger aperture. Add an additional guide scope and CCD. Add a dedicated CCD for image capturing.

I look forward to seeing your first attempts with your new kit.

_________________
Lee Diggle
My Astronomy Blog | My Photography Gallery


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 10:07 pm 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 08, 2005 3:32 pm
Posts: 9962
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
I would also echo Symtex's comment about joining an astro society - you'll have access to both equipment and people who know how to use it!

I had many fond times at the Huddersfield Astronomical Society in West Yorkshire, UK.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 10:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2008 4:31 am
Posts: 296
I would like to apologize if I haven't post any picture yet. I had some difficulty with my CG5 mount. Turns out it was an lemon. I bought my equipment used from a trusted dealer in Vancouver. He truthfully admitted he didn't submitted the equipment through a thorough test before selling it to me. So he offered me to trade-in the mount for a new HEQ5 mount as long as I pay for the difference at his cost. (around 250$).

I should be able to take some snap this weekend.

_________________
Canon T2i (550D)- Tamron 17-50 F2.8 Non-VC, Sigma 70-200mm F2.8 EX DG OS HSM, Canon EF-S 55-250mm F4.5-F5.6
http://www.astronomyphotography.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 11, 2008 8:27 pm
Posts: 404
Location: Bristol, UK
Oh no, thats not good to hear. I did purchase the EQ5 mount a few weeks back and that was a dud, it not track automatically so I have sent that back and I am waiting to purchase my new mount.

_________________
Lee Diggle
My Astronomy Blog | My Photography Gallery


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group