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PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:53 pm 
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popo wrote:
Zoomed in live view with manual focus seems best. Without that, you'll just have to take test shots and make small adjustments to help get it perfect. Of course you have to make sure to do this before the event to maximise time available, and not to knock it OOF before then. But I wonder how much earlier you can do it, in case of zoom creep and maybe even thermal expansion?


Well, I was talking about night/star photography in general ;)
Looks like I'll have to try liveview with a big boost in brightness and zoom in. thanks.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 4:14 am 
Thanks for the link Gordon. I just read the "Camera Labs lens buying guide". It is very nice and very helpful. Thanks.

HI, Citruspers. Yes you are right, if you are taking photos night sky, twisting the lens completely to the right does not make the lens to infinity as per my experience goes. Infinity is just little before the focus ring stops rotating, when you turn it to right side.

Also, it depends upon lens to lens. So, where the Live-View is not available, like in my case, I take a shot zoom to max and see it the star is sharp.

Stars do not appear round as they are point sourced objects, this is because of the distance. So, focusing needs to be adjusted until the star/s appears as a small dot/point.
----------------------------------------

Gordon, I have a telescope (6" Newtonian), I use A-Focal method to photograph the moon. Yes its quite a hard thing to focus, but still photographing moon with scope and dslr combination is now much easier for me than photographing the Stars.

So, I am sure I should not have any problems photographing the Sun. Yes, there might be some issues when taking care of the exposure part!

I have one more question (there is so much to learn, cant stop
asking :) ). I was checking out the "Custom Functions" in my camera 400D they are quite confusing.

-> Shutter/AE Lock Button
-> AF-assist beam
-> E-TTL II
-> Shutter Curtain sync

I have checked these in the manual but the info provided seems to be less.

.... Plz let me know if there is site/link which can describe these in detail.


thanks.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 4:20 am 
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Can anyone show me what I'll need for stuff like this? I'm mostly wondering about how to mount all of it to the body, what mounts work with which telescopes?

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 5:39 am 
Shagrath wrote:
Can anyone show me what I'll need for stuff like this? I'm mostly wondering about how to mount all of it to the body, what mounts work with which telescopes?


Hi Shagrath, If this is your gear -Nikon D40 | 50mm f/1.8 | 18-55mm | 55-200mm VR and you want to mount your Nikon D40 to a telescope, then you need a T-mount for A-Focal method (that is just the telescope and the DSLR with out the lens).

I got my t mount from ebay for around $5 or so. Be sure that the t mount you get (if you buy), is listed as for Nikon.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 5:40 am 
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Hi Phani, you're best asking about the custom functions in the Canon section.

Hi Shagrath, Phani's right, you normally use a T-mount adapter to mount a DSLR to a scope - see this video, which also shows how useful Live View is for this kind of thing...

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon ... aphy.shtml


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 10:00 am 
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phani_astronomy wrote:
Thanks for the link Gordon. I just read the "Camera Labs lens buying guide". It is very nice and very helpful. Thanks.

HI, Citruspers. Yes you are right, if you are taking photos night sky, twisting the lens completely to the right does not make the lens to infinity as per my experience goes. Infinity is just little before the focus ring stops rotating, when you turn it to right side.

Also, it depends upon lens to lens. So, where the Live-View is not available, like in my case, I take a shot zoom to max and see it the star is sharp.

Stars do not appear round as they are point sourced objects, this is because of the distance. So, focusing needs to be adjusted until the star/s appears as a small dot/point.
----------------------------------------

Gordon, I have a telescope (6" Newtonian), I use A-Focal method to photograph the moon. Yes its quite a hard thing to focus, but still photographing moon with scope and dslr combination is now much easier for me than photographing the Stars.

So, I am sure I should not have any problems photographing the Sun. Yes, there might be some issues when taking care of the exposure part!

I have one more question (there is so much to learn, cant stop
asking :) ). I was checking out the "Custom Functions" in my camera 400D they are quite confusing.

-> Shutter/AE Lock Button
-> AF-assist beam
-> E-TTL II
-> Shutter Curtain sync

I have checked these in the manual but the info provided seems to be less.

.... Plz let me know if there is site/link which can describe these in detail.


thanks.


thanks!

About the features:
Shutter/AE button locks the exposure as far as I can see
AF assist beam strobes your flash to get proper autofocus
E-TTL has to do with flash metering.
Rear curtain sync fires the flash at the end of the exposure, instead of at the beginning, so you can get a nice blurred streak behing someone.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 12:58 pm 
Hy thanks for that..

I was just checking out some videos in YouTube and here what I got... this is cool. The Best explanation with graphics...

I will also provide this link in the Canon Section with the subject name changed to Shutter Sync.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xnn5nzPvoIM


regards,


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 28, 2009 1:37 pm 
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Nothing new for me, but thanks! :)

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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 7:57 am 
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Thanks for the tips, phani_astronomy and Gordon! I think I might get started with astro photography sometime soon then, it doesn't seem too expensive. One question remains though, do all telescopes use the same size of tube into the eye piece? Does the t-mount come with the tube?

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PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 8:48 am 
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Most scope use 1.25 inch eyepieces until you get to bigger ones. Very common standard size.

The camera adapter may vary with who makes it or where you get it from. Commonly you will see a so called T-ring which adapts from camera mount to T-mount. Then you need a T-mount to eyepiece adapter. Sometimes they're made in one piece. Depending on the scope there may be alternate connections too. Some scopes may have an alternate connection point too.

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PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2009 12:25 am 
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popo wrote:
Most scope use 1.25 inch eyepieces until you get to bigger ones. Very common standard size.

The camera adapter may vary with who makes it or where you get it from. Commonly you will see a so called T-ring which adapts from camera mount to T-mount. Then you need a T-mount to eyepiece adapter. Sometimes they're made in one piece. Depending on the scope there may be alternate connections too. Some scopes may have an alternate connection point too.


So it isn't really as easy as buying a t-mount then is it...Hmmm.

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PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2009 9:13 am 
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Hi Popo, I'd say most mid to large scopes have 2in focusing barrels - that's what you see on my Televue Genesis in the video I posted earlier.

But yes, it's ultimately about getting a tube which fits in the focusing barrel - either 2in or 1.25in - then fitting a T-mount on the end for your particular camera mount, like Canon EF. Most telescope shops will sell tubes with T-mount adapters already fitted.


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PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2009 12:47 pm 
Hi Shagrath,

May I ask you what telescope you have (reflector or refractor, size etc)?

Yes, astrophotography will not cost you much if you are planning for wide field photography (just the camera, lens, remote/timer and good tripod are enough).

However, once you bring the scopes into picture, the things start to get complicated. Starting from the T-mount and T adapter.

Regarding the tube size you asked, Popo and Gordon said it right and perfect.

I got my T-mount from ebay at very cheap price. I hope the below link is useful to you:

http://shop.ebay.com/items/__canon-t-mo ... ec0Q2em359


regards,


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PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2009 9:08 pm 
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Well I don't have a telescope yet. Which would you guys recommend for a cheap price? I haven't really done much research into what brands or types are best.

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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 11:14 pm 
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Hi Shagrath, I can't personally recommend a cheap telescope as it will only end up disappointing you, especially if you want to get into photography with it. I'd recommend joining a local astronomy club instead as they'll have access to some decent kit which you may be able to try out - not to mention members who are experienced in such matters who can advise you. That's how I started out in astro-photography beyond a few star trails with an old SLR.


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