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PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:24 pm 
:?:
I've been shooting track and field for two years now. I often find that the action moves to quick to focus and then reframe my composition.

My only resolve is to center my intended focal point in the frame at a high enough image quality (RAW) so I can then crop my comp and frame it to my liking.

Does anyone have any suggestions on capturing your focal point without the composition suffering?

thanks all!!


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:32 pm 
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I do the same for wildlife. Center them with a wide enough angle to crop into later.

Other choice is to manual pre-focus at a distance and wait for them to enter the zone before snapping.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:19 pm 
yeah if you use camera that has only several AF this could be problem. I think you did the best, center focus and crop.

The other solution is get a better camera that has more AF points


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 4:57 pm 
cholloman73, welcome to the forum.

One simple tip is to have the action in the centre of the frame so that you don't miss much that happens around it. As you've mentioned, cropping later on for the composition that you want is one way of doing it.

If you want to be more advanced, then prefocus onto a section of the track where you know there will be action, frame what you anticipate might happen, and then wait for it to come to you. This may have a lower success rate at first, but after a while, it does yield good results.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2009 7:16 pm 
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hi,
I would agree with you Ed and Popo, I think trying manual focusing prior to the subject passing is a great exercise. In the good old days that's all we had any way.
John :)

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