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PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 10:41 am 
Hi all,
I was looking at the Tamron 70-300mm lens since it is very affordable and reasonably priced. The one disadvantage everybody highlited was the noisy motor and sometimes poor autofocus. Otherwise it is a great deal for the price.
I believe that this one is not an optically stabilised lens, since it nowhere mentions that.
I am interested in daylight bird photography by using this lens with a Canon 1000d.
In realistic conditions, the max usable iso is 400. So can a non is 300mm lens give jitter free images at iso 400?
Thanks for your time....
Jinay.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 6:19 pm 
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Jitter-free images? Depends on the light conditions you're shooting in. On a normal or sunny day, at ISO 400, f/5.6 (I guess) and ISO 400 it shouldn't be a problem. On a rainy day, it might.

The AF performance you read about might be more of a problem. You have to track to birds, and if AF performance is below par, that's gonna be more of a challenge than you might like. Ask some users of this Tamron or read a couple more reviews and see whether the AF performance will be good enough for your uses.

- Bjorn -

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 Post subject: Tamron 70 - 300
PostPosted: Tue Jan 19, 2010 8:55 pm 
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Hello

I do not have this lens I have the sigma 70 -300 apo dg macro - as far as I am aware the Tamron would be about the same speed for focus and better at the 300mm end than the sigma and I find the sigma suitable on a Pentax K10d (I believe that your camera's autofocus would be quicker than the K10d - by how much I do not know).

The Sigma is apparently better between 70 -135 - they are about even between 135 and 200 and between 200 - 300 things drop off but the Tamron fares better. This is based on my memory so I may have made an error so it's best that you check this in case my dodgy old brain has let me down.

I use the Sigma on a Pentax K10d and I find the focus to be fine - I have plenty of shots of birds and have not had a problem - there are better lenses but you will have to shell out far more.

Hope this helps.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 11:12 am 
Thanks for your replies,

However, I am new to manual photography. So, Assuming a normal sunny day and lens at 300mm, ISO at 400, what would be the fastest shutter speed I can use?
From what I know, they say the shutter speed should be above 1/500, i.e towards 1/1000 and definitely not longer than 1/250 for jitter-free images.
So, do you thing that is possible?

Also, regarding the Sigma lens, reviews say that autofocus is slow, as with the Tamron, and sometimes inaccurate. But, most reviews were good. Is the Sigma worth buying? In India, Tamron is way cheaper at Rs.8,000 against Rs.12,000 for the Sigma.

Thanks again!


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 7:54 pm 
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hi jinay... regarding bird photography... I think you will be leaning more towards the 1000 end of the shutter speed if not even a bit higher.. especially for birds in flight.

Also.. keep in mind that even though the day might be sunny there will be more instances than not that you will be shooting birds in the shade or with a dark backround.. especially smaller birds. Medium sized to larger birds dont cause too many issues except for the ones with fast wing beats, such as ducks, when flying.. smaller birds tend to be very twitchy and its easy to get blurred images.

I dont know anyone who shoots a tamron lens but I know kpr uses the Sigma with great results.

Do you have the opportunity to go to a local photography store and actually try out both lenses as well as others... at the end of the day I think that will answer a lot of questions for you.

Also.. back to birds... not sure if you are talking about going out and shooting birds in the wild or in an urban environ but keep in mind that birds in the wild are gonna be a lot more spooky than urban birds... also keep in mind that when most people talk about serious bird photography they mention 400mm as a minimum length.. you're gonna get some great shots with a 300mm but you will miss quite a few as well... I know I have a 400mm and although I get most of my shots I still wish I had a 600mm for bird photography especially. One thing that does save me a lot is the fact that my camera has a 15mp sensor allowing me to crop quite a bit and still get good results.

Focus speed is more of a big deal for birds in my opinion than with any other wildlife photography so it does become very important and should be a serious consideration.

As far as jitters.. not sure bout you but I know the rarer the animal I come across the more jitters I get and the more fumbling I do and lastly.. the chances of mistakes go up as well.. I tend to be very excitable when it comes to wildlife :oops:

Lastly.. when it comes to wildlife photography I always shoot in burst mode.. its still easy enough to shoot one shot when you have the time but when it comes to catching a take off or a specific behavior your odds go up massively if you shoot bursts.

hope this helps a bit :)

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 8:55 pm 
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Location: Wales
Hello again Jinay

Firstly, I agree with Wolfsong and I also regularly check out his and KPR's pics - thumbs up there.

I do not post photo's - one day I will just right now I can't fit it in however Wolfsong and KPR regularly upload their pics so any advice they give you is backed up by their pics so if anything I say contradicts them (I will try not to) it's probably best to listen to them :o)

I have the Sigma as mentioned above and it is far from perfect but I like it however, I am hoping to purchase a lens of at least 500mm as Wolfsong says 300mm is not always long enough.

If my memory serves me correctly the sigma and tamron are roughly similar in autofocus and I chose the sigma as the macro capability appeared to be better than the Tamron as well as the shorter end of the zoom but the Tamron wins at the 300mm end so in my humble opinion there are three good reasons to go for the Tamron.

1. It's cheaper
2. It will be better at 300mm which should be more suited to your needs
3. The money you save could be saved towards a longer lens you will almost certainly want at a later date :shock:

In terms or autofocus I use the Pentax K10d - many say that the autofocus is slower than rivals, they are probably right but it is quick enough for me.

My sigma 70-300 is faster and more precise that my 18-55 Pentax kit lens (a bit surprising I suppose) but maybe not as quick as my Sigma 50mm ex dg macro but there is not a lot in it.

One thing I have noticed is whilst pointing the lens at birds, squirrels etc the lens/autofocus will change in an instant should something else cross the selected af point such as another bird, sometimes insects (bees are not as much of a problem as butterflies (kinda obvious I suppose), branches moving in the wind or even a falling leaf this can ruin the shot but shows how quick the focus actually is - not always a good thing as the focus sometimes locks on to the other subject momentarily and then flicks back to the original target other times it just gets momentarily confused. I am yet to use a more expensive lens so cannot give a comparison here (help - Wolfsong/KPR maybe)

I have plent of shots of moving animals, birds etc but squirrels seem to hide from me - I will track them down :o)

It takes a bit of practice to track moving objects but it can be done I really like the Sigma and should I not splash out on something such as the Sigma 150- 500 (The Tamron 200-500 is not available in a Pentax mount, in the UK at least) then I may look at obtaining a used Tamrom 70-300 for use with for shooting birds using the 300mm end.

If you like the Tamron as much as I do the Sigma then your money will have been well spent - that is of course my opinion and that's all.

Cheers


Stu.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 9:27 pm 
was looking at this lense also and was only the lack or VR that was putting me off ..

so if you were to use the lense despite this say with a faster iso as stated it would help counteract the camera shake as long as there was plenty of light ??


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 1:44 am 
Thanks for all your replies!
Regarding what you mentioned Wolfsong, is it better to use digital zoom on your camera or crop on the computer?
Thanks.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 2:59 am 
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I've haven't played with digital zoom since I had a small pocket camera with it and my experiences back then were not good at all... no idea how it looks these days.... I stick with cropping where needed... hopefully someone else will have more experience with it and can be of more help.

I did take the time to research a bit in regards to AF and came across a youtube video showing the speed and noise of the Tamron... please keep in mind that my personal experiences are limited only to canon lenses and in specific the 100-400 and a few others.... that being said the tamron is definately slower and a noisier... that being said, from the video, it didnt seem bad to me at all. I am at this point waiting for a lens coat for my 100-400 and one of the things they mention about them besides offering camo and protection from bangs and weather is that the neoprene also acts as an insulation against noise cutting down the noise the lens makes.. something to keep in mind if you get the tamron and if you do find it noisy.

The first thing you obviously need to take into consideration is your budget but another thing to keep in mind are the optics of these lenses.. canon lenses may be a lot more expensive but with that price you get better optics, smoother operation and better build when you look at the L series.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:57 am 
WOW, Wolfsong!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:P :!: :!: :!: :shock: :shock: :shock:

Your photographs are SPECTACULAR!!!!!!!!


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 5:29 pm 
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jinay wrote:
WOW, Wolfsong!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:P :!: :!: :!: :shock: :shock: :shock:

Your photographs are SPECTACULAR!!!!!!!!


Blame kpr, popo and everyone else here for that.... they have given me a lot of hints along the way :)

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jan 21, 2010 11:30 pm 
was just looking at the sigma 70-300mm and noticed there was an APO and a DG version

other than that and a little weight difference i could see the difference although i'm sure i'll be missing something :lol:

can any one throw a little light please


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 1:05 am 
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I have the DG 300mm Sigma.
Quite happy with its performance and the results it gives.
For the price...under $300 CDN it was perfect,just didn't quite reach as far as I wanted it to.
I stepped up to the 500mm and now for the most part it sits in my gear bag.
I would say 99% of my BIF shots are taken at 400ISO with both lenses.
I get best results from the 300 at less than 300mm which means having to get much closer or cropping...especially on truly wild birds.

The best asset to this lens...well for me anyway...
Finding out if it was in my interest to spend the money on a bigger lens.
I'd rather have the >$300 lens collecting dust than a <$1000 lens not getting used as much as it should.

$300 well spent IMO :)

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 8:14 am 
kpr wrote:
I'd rather have the >$300 lens collecting dust than a <$1000 lens not getting used as much as it should.

$300 well spent IMO :)


point taken :D

thanx for the info guys, i now know what i'm getting for my Birthday :P


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