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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 11:59 pm 
hey folks, i figure this would be the best spot to ask such a question:

by the end of the month, i hope to have my new camera...and sometime after that a dedicated macro lens.

i am still working out which would be better, 60mm or 105mm
the few differences i know of are focusing distance, where a 105mm will allow you to stand a bit farther back from the subject, which could come in handy for insects and the like....
also, for magnification, usually i see 1:1 as the standard ratio..can you get bigger than that? would that be useful?

one more thing.....a ringlight or macro flash....if i decide to get a 105mm lens, affording me more space between the subject, would a ringlight still be useful???

thanks folks!!


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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 5:48 pm 
Well whats the name of that of that flash setup that Nikon has to offer with the two flashes mounted on the sides of the lens?

I m not a big macro fan, but here r some reviews:

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/60mm-afd.htm - 60mm

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/105af.htm - 105mm

if your planning on shooting insects i guess that the 105 sounds as an obvious better because it allows you to work at longer distances plus it add the benefit that if in the future you want a tripod you dont need to think about the min altitude of the tripod...


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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 6:28 pm 
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Hi supervillain, if you can afford it go for the Nikon VR 105mm:
- only stabilized macro in the world
- longer distance to your subject
As to flash, I use a SB800 as slave to the built in flash with good results. Methinks ringflash does not sculpt your subject as it is inherently shadowless. So you need a ringflash only if you're into forensics or other type of science, but not necessarily for nice macro shots...

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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 9:02 pm 
i see i see!
i plan on getting the sb800 speedlight at some point, but i wasnt to sure about the ringlight! thank you, i dont plan on being on CSI anytime soon :)

i know the nikon has VR, but is that lens comparable to the sigma 105mm?? thats a bit more in my price range for the time being?

oh, and while you are here: the sb800, will i be able to hold that off to the side and trigger it remotely?? i believe there is some wireless capability...also, what range does that wireless have??
thanks for the always helpful respones :)


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PostPosted: Sat May 03, 2008 9:21 pm 
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If you're working from a tripod, the Sigma and Tamron 105mm are quite capable.
The SB800 comes with a little stand to hold the flash while you're working on your subject. The remote capabilities are onlylimited by the reach of the onboard flash, i.e. 10m and more. Certainly enough for macro work :wink:

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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2008 1:50 am 
thanks again people

sooo from what you just said to me, the sb800 can fire from a signal sent from the onboard flash??

so, i can theoretically set the sb800 by an object, then have the camera a certain distance away and be able to use both flashes? with no wires?
thats intriguing!

going back to the sigma vs nikkor lens, i think i would find the VR very handy...i dont foresee myself walking around with my tripod all the time :)


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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2008 5:30 am 
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Yes the Nikon lighting system is one of the best in the world. Just make sure that the body does suport being master (D80 and larger can, not sure about D40/60 - have to look it up).
As to VR: one of the real challenges of macro-photography is the enourmous magnification of shake. So having IS/VR is absolutely beneficial for macro shots. (the other challenge being the extra slim dof)

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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2008 10:31 am 
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There are also twin light flashes for macro, where theres a ring on the end of the lens with two flashes on it aiming from right and left or top and bottom kind of thing, that could help out a bit.


JAke

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