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PostPosted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 8:40 pm 
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Hi guys,

I'm kind of torn. I'd really like the 50mm f2 macro lens by zuiko digital, but i've also heard good stories about the 12-60mm for portrait purposes. The macro one is quite a bit cheaper and it allows me to take macro pictures of course. But the 12-60 is also a very nice wide-angle to mild tele lens.
What to do?

thanks ahead!

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 1:01 pm 
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You're probably going to be better off if you ask this question in the Olympus thread.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 2:03 pm 
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I think that F-2 works greats for portraits in general...2-3 seems to be a good number when i m checking out the "family" portraits that i have taken, just give the whole image a very nice bokeh...

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 4:17 pm 
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I've always been told:
50mm for portraits is the way to go on cropped sensors.

I'm gonna get the 50mm 1.4 i think. Mainly for portraits ;)

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 5:02 pm 
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alex168 wrote:
I think that F-2 works greats for portraits in general...2-3 seems to be a good number when i m checking out the "family" portraits that i have taken, just give the whole image a very nice bokeh...


It's a personal preference as well as working with your surroundings. Quite often I stop my lenses to 5.6 for a compromise between optical quality and getting the right amount of DoF. Below is a random snapshot (it's not really a portrait, nor was it meant to be), but something recent that demonstrates that you don't need a lens to be fully blown to get that bokeh.

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150mm @ f/5.6, 1/250, ISO 2200.

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 6:23 pm 
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Hi Paukl,

The 50mm produces better bokeh than the 12-60mm, plus it's cheaper, smaller and has macro capability. The only downside is the lens hunts when the lighting is not good. The 35-100mm/f2 is the best portrait lens in the 4/3rds world, but its size will scare off many people. The Pana-Leica 14-50 (kit lens of Panasonic L1) is also an excellent portrait lens.

The 12-60mm and 50mm are two completely different lenses. The former is a better all-around lens while the latter is rather a dedicated macro & portrait lens.

The fact that 4/3rds cameras have more DOF than other formats is often regarded as a huge disadvantage in portrait photography, where shallow DOF is often desired. I don't buy into many people's "the shallower the better" philosophy but I do think a faster lens is better because it gives you more DOF control. You don't have to always shoot at the widest aperture.

IMO, you can already start taking portraits with the 70-300mm which yields much shallower DOF than the 14-42mm, if working distance is not a problem for you.

Hope it helps.

Best Regards,
Tony

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 11:28 pm 
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Hey guys, thanks for the advice.
Right now I'm shooting with an old 50mm 1.8 analog lens with a converter which gives nice bokeh but its also very hard to get the subject sharp with. i'm pretty much leaning towards getting the 50mm f2 macro now. thanks!

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 10, 2008 11:11 pm 
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for portrait use, i recommend the 50mm

but due to the crop factor (the range will be 100mm), it might be best to use in a big room or outdoor

25mm f/2.8 pancake is a nother option if u shoot olympus. but this kit lens might not as good as above lenses.

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