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 Post subject: Where to start???
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 7:23 pm 
What's up people? I need to make my own studio because I want to do some studio photography work, I've been getting a lot of requests lately from people who would like some nice pictures taken of their own. Most of them would prefer a solid background for their photo shoot and of course the light has to be awsome for the pictures to come out right. I saw some pictures on www.flickr.com which were taken in a studio, I've put some links here so you can see in what direction I'm going.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/9353810@N0 ... 652839886/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/janekm/2417238098/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sweethobbes/2242832784/

At the bottom of this post you can see what equipment I'm using, I'll try to get the Nikon SC-29 Flash Cord as soon as possible. Then I would be able to take more creative pictures.
Please, if you could tell me what I need to buy or if you got any tips for me to make this a success just let me know :D. Thanks in advance...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 9:28 pm 
Are you looking for gear? Then you might look into the small kits as this. I tihknk this would be a great kit to start off with, and will probably last a bit i think.

I think that some better and cheaper kits can be found if you look around on the internet.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 9:40 pm 
The easiest way to get good results without splurging on too much kit is a reflector, a white muslin sheet and natural light. Then you can progress onto a monolamp set-up, then two, and then three. Build your lighting knowledge up from the basics and you'll find you can achieve great results without needing to have to spend a vast amount. Avoid artificial light too soon.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:05 pm 
0eyvind wrote:
Are you looking for gear? Then you might look into the small kits as this. I tihknk this would be a great kit to start off with, and will probably last a bit i think.

I think that some better and cheaper kits can be found if you look around on the internet.


Wow, pretty expensive. But I'll search on amazon or some other websites to see if I can get any cheaper packages.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:10 pm 
Photoj wrote:
The easiest way to get good results without splurging on too much kit is a reflector, a white muslin sheet and natural light. Then you can progress onto a monolamp set-up, then two, and then three. Build your lighting knowledge up from the basics and you'll find you can achieve great results without needing to have to spend a vast amount. Avoid artificial light too soon.


Thanks for the advice! That's a great idea :D! How about the background? What can I use? Did you see the first link that I posted? The girl with the guitar, if you take a good look the background looks like one big white sheet or something. She's also standing on it so it's pretty big. I'm thinking of maybe getting just one light,a couple of reflectors and a background.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:10 pm 
You generally get what you pay for...see above for my advice.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 11:23 pm 
Photoj wrote:
You generally get what you pay for...see above for my advice.


Yes I know, I'm gonna go with your advice. The only problem is that here in Aruba there is only one Camera Store, but they don't sell reflectors and lights. They only sell some lenses,cameras,tripods etc. So I would have to order some reflectors, maybe even a light? Only one to start I think...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 01, 2008 10:49 pm 
Just noticed this thread as you mentioned one of my images (the one in the middle of Marisa), so I thought I might as well answer too...

The description of how that image was taken is already under the image so just some general pointers...
The main light was softened with a shoot-through umbrella which would be a cheap and simple addition to the flash you've got already.
While it's true that to some extent you get what you pay for (studio strobes recycle more quickly, are more quick to adjust, can put out more light [which you don't need with a digital SLR]), at the end of the day light is light and you can achieve a lot with a few strobes like the one you've got already and some simple light shaping tools.

The flash cord you mentioned is a sensible option to get your flash off your camera (you'll also likely find a light stand and umbrella adapter for your flash useful).
You can add a second, cheap strobe (doesn't have to be as fancy as the SB-600 if you're happy to learn setting your flashes up manually) for more flexibility.

When I'm not in the studio I use two old Nikon flashes (SB-24, SB-28DX) together with cheap Chinese radio triggers ($20 delivered for a set...). Works great and doesn't break the bank.

The site strobist.com is well worth checking out for lots of advice on lighting on a budget....


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2008 1:28 pm 
janekm wrote:
Just noticed this thread as you mentioned one of my images (the one in the middle of Marisa), so I thought I might as well answer too...

The description of how that image was taken is already under the image so just some general pointers...
The main light was softened with a shoot-through umbrella which would be a cheap and simple addition to the flash you've got already.
While it's true that to some extent you get what you pay for (studio strobes recycle more quickly, are more quick to adjust, can put out more light [which you don't need with a digital SLR]), at the end of the day light is light and you can achieve a lot with a few strobes like the one you've got already and some simple light shaping tools.

The flash cord you mentioned is a sensible option to get your flash off your camera (you'll also likely find a light stand and umbrella adapter for your flash useful).
You can add a second, cheap strobe (doesn't have to be as fancy as the SB-600 if you're happy to learn setting your flashes up manually) for more flexibility.

When I'm not in the studio I use two old Nikon flashes (SB-24, SB-28DX) together with cheap Chinese radio triggers ($20 delivered for a set...). Works great and doesn't break the bank.

The site strobist.com is well worth checking out for lots of advice on lighting on a budget....


Haha, that's a coincedence :lol: ! I've seen all of you pictures if I'm not mistaken, very nice pictures. Thanks for the tips, those are some great tips. I have to start as soon as possible because from the day I posted this until now I got like 3 other requests, so I would have to do something about that. But I have some questions...Is there a difference between photo shooting with strobe lights with a soft box and photo shooting with 2 or 3 flashes with an umbrella for the flashes? I'm a little confused there, also where can I buy those 20$ radio triggers :P ?
Thanks in advance :D


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