Free Shipping on ALL Products
camera reviewsbest cameraslens reviewsphotography tipscamera forumvideo toursphotography bookssupport me
It is currently Wed Aug 20, 2014 5:10 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 3:58 pm 
Here are some pictures I've taken. All with my 40D and the Kit 28-135mm 3.5-5.6 IS. I am not very experienced with editing. But I made an attempt to correct white balance on the image with Canon's Digital Photo Professional and adjusted slight brightness, contrast, and a little sharpness. Questions are:

What do you think?
Colors (expecially on the child) don't seem to be very strong? Anything I can change when shooting to help with color?
I'm also starting to wonder if my lens doesn't focus very well. But I'm not sure yet. I'm still using my original firmware, not sure if that will change anything.

And just in general what you think of the photo's the one of the couple was for a friend to get wedding invitation pictures.
thanks

Image

ISO 100
Shutter: 1/250
F 4.5
53mm


Image

ISO 100
Shutter: 1/100
F 5.6
95mm

Image

ISO 100
Shutter: 1/125
F 4.5
60mm

Image

ISO 100
Shutter: 1/100
F4
44mm


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 8:29 pm 
Well, from the size that these "previews" are, it seems like the focus is just fine.

If you do feel a bit unsure about the focus, view your full resolution images at 100% and see if the wrong thing(s) are in focus, or if anything is in focus.

Regarding the images, they all look very well exposed, so good job on that!

The composition in them all is great too! You have a lovely daughter and she was captured very well. Great sense of happiness coming from her.

The colors, some are a bit better than the rest. You can see that #2 has a bit more saturation than the other two.

Now I have no experience with the Canon software you used, but I suggest that you look around the program and see if you can find anything that will adjust "Saturation". When you find it, boost the saturation bit by bit and you will see some great warm colors coming in!

Overall, good work and keep on taking portraits!


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 10:31 pm 
thanks for the positive complements. These pictures are focused fairly well. I have many that aren't on as good as these. I do keep an eye on my shutter speeds. But sometimes they still don't seem to get dead on like I would like. I need to figure out a little more about my metering modes. Not really sure about how those all work.

I've seen some pictures with so much more color. This link is the first one I could find.

http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=7411

I know his picture is much sharper than mine, but even just looking at the brilliant color there is a huge difference.

Yesterday I turned my Saturation up on my camera one notch, went and took some pictures of flowers, and the colors just seemed to unnatural. like a TV with the colors turned up to high.

thanks again for the comment, gives me a little motivation. :D

And that is my Wifes sisters child, she is a cute one though.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 11:25 pm 
Sdrummer wrote:
Regarding the images, they all look very well exposed, so good job on that!

The composition in them all is great too! Overall, good work and keep on taking portraits!


I agree on the first and last parts, but without wanting to be discouraging, there's a lot of room to improve composition. Let's just take image #2. You've chosen to adapt something that at first hand looks akin to the rule of thirds. However, if you don't mind my dissection of your image, you can see below that it is actually more centre weighted.

Image

The intersections aren't being used, and although you captured a memorable moment, it's not a very striking image. Were it to be more striking, you could have stood in front of your niece with the bird bath in between both of you and at her eye level focused on her gaze and played with the DoF. As it stands, my eye wanders without a strong focal point. You could also clone out the object popping into the top left corner.

I won't dissect the other photos of your niece, but with them all there's similarly the scope to improve composition. This is why I disagree with Sdrummer's generous praise.

As for the wedding invitation photo, I'm glad to see some of our old discussion's filtered in with a much less distracting background here. However composition and lighting fail you. How so? Well, compositionally as before, it's seemingly masquerading as a rule of third follower...but again if you inspect it closer, it doesn't. It's another centrally composed image. Not that that's bad, but it's not dynamic. The other problem is with focal points. There are 3 here: his face, her face and his shoe. Finally the smallest problem with the composition: it isn't straight - something that could be remedied with some PP. I know you've allowed me to edit your images in the past, so hoping you'll allow me again, below is a different interpretation that works a little better.

Image

It's been straightened, and yes, it's still centrally composed because of your original framing, but what this does is eliminate that shoe and the excessive space in the background. It focuses on the two most important people concerning the invitation. The faces have been lifted with a small amount of digital fill light.

Which brings me onto lighting. One way to look at why your lighting is so is most likely because you aimed to frame the image with the bridge in the background and not around the lighting. And of course you could say that there's no way to control the direction of sunlight. Without wanting to repeat my latest entry to my blog, take a look at some of my advice on outdoor portraiture and how to control light.

And lighting is where you come a cropper; it will be a factor that explains why colour in your photos aren't as good as the one by SnS that you've linked to. There just isn't enough contrast and dynamic range in your images. Image #2 has a bit more range and Sdrummer mentioned that of the 3 it looked most saturated. On my monitors they're all equal except the lighting in #2 is marginally better making it appear more saturated. Then we come to the added factor of your monitor colour calibration which may play a part in what you find in your images.

Don't be discouraged; you've made ground since I last saw your work, but there's still a lot more room for improvement.

EDIT: re: focusing issues - are you finding that the lens doesn't lock onto an object, or that the resulting photo isn't sharp? If it's on one particular lens, you might have a decentered copy, if it's all lenses, perhaps an AF issue with your 40D, if in low light, then you're probably not getting enough light for the AF module OR looking at your EXIF, I suspect that it might be DoF issues. In the wedding photo you can see that his face is less sharp than hers, and this is down to the shallow DoF at f4 with him being positioned behind her.


Last edited by Photoj on Sat May 23, 2009 3:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2008 6:50 pm 
ouch, but its ok. I didn't notice the picture was not straight but after looking at the trees the seem a bit tilted. Many times with the lines that leave the camera at an angle play tricks with my eye's. I've tried to use vertical lines or trees and look at my focus points in my viewfinder to help keeping things straight. I need to pay more attention to that. Rule of thirds I tend to have that on my mind in certain situations, and then others I completely forget. This day was difficult because the yard had many, many, distractions and I was trying to capture the moment on these shots. I remember constantly thinking to be patient and wait for it, and don't get any huge distractions in the background. So other techniques seemed to go astray. I need more practice. I'm looking to purchase a new lens for portraits, and take some photo's of friends and family's to get more experience but am waiting it off for the lens. Even though my issues weren't lens related, I wanted to get a feel for the new lens and its qualities/abilities.

thanks for the comments, and I almost never mind people modifying my pictures. I'm here to learn.


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2008 7:57 pm 
I'm happy you've taken the CC well. It's all about experience, and when you've taken photographs, self-analyse them, and work on where to improve and the technique.

The rule of thirds doesn't have to be followed all the time, but when learning about composition, it's the first major stepping stone.

Finally, the current lenses you have are suitable for portraits. I see no reason why you can't keep taking portraiture.


Top
  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All words, images, videos and layout, copyright 2005-2012 Gordon Laing. May not be used without permission.
/ How we test / Best Cameras / Advertising / Camera reviews / Supporting Camera Labs

Webdesign by Alphabase IT
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group