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PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 6:54 pm 
These photo's where made at the Normandy coast...let me know what you like or dislike about them.
Image.....Image


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 7:29 pm 
:shock: Wow! Those are wonderful! I love the colours of the light and the composition is great too. Could you give some tips on how you achieved these photos? I've attempted slow shutter speed photos of the sea in the past, but to no avail...


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 7:57 pm 
Very nice indeed!

Could you tell us what settings you used?

Personally, I like the first somewhat more. In the second the red in the sky could somewhat be more pronounced, but that´s the way I would like it.

If you have more of these beatiful pics, don´t hesitate to post them! :wink:

Kind regards,

ngc94227


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:04 pm 
calmac1991 wrote:
:shock: Wow! Those are wonderful! I love the colours of the light and the composition is great too. Could you give some tips on how you achieved these photos? I've attempted slow shutter speed photos of the sea in the past, but to no avail...


Thank you for the comment. Both photo's are exposure blends from two pics. I use one photo exposed for the foreground and one photo for the sky exposure. You need a sturdy tripod to get both photo's exactly the same other than the exposure. Later on you can use photoshop to add them together in layers.

These two photo's had about 5-6 sec shutterspeed at f16 for the foreground exposure. The longer the shutterspeed the flatter the sea.
If there's to much light for me to get a longer exposure i use a 3 stop ND to slow down the shutterspeed. I always use the lowest iso-setting of the camera and adjust from there by adding an ND-filter or by using a smaller aperture until i get the exposuretime that i want. I hope this was usefull info.....if not just ask me for some more. :)


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:49 pm 
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Very good, like both very much!
So it's some kind of hand-made HDR?!

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 10:27 pm 
so many lives lost at such a beautiful place


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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 12:05 am 
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I like them both but the first one is just stunning! I'd like to know exactly how to blend two layers in PS, one thing I've never understood.

More of this will be nice.

Zorro 8)

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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 12:19 am 
Whoa - what's NOT to like about these pictures??!

Very nicely done.

They both looks a little HDR-like to me - not that this is a bad thing by definition. My impression is merely, when seeing them, that this light cannot be "real".

This is not a critique by any means, just an observation.

Looking forward to seeing more pictures from that area if you make more, they are really a treat to behold!

Cheers :-)


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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 3:18 am 
Awesome!


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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 10:23 am 
zorro wrote:
I like them both but the first one is just stunning! I'd like to know exactly how to blend two layers in PS, one thing I've never understood.

More of this will be nice.

Zorro 8)


Thanks for all the comments. :)

There are many way's to blend two or more photo's into one. It all depends on the transition zone between foreground and sky. If this zone is very straight(seahorizon) the workmethod is very easy. I used to work with gradient neutral density filters(Cokin) to get the job done....but there where more negative than positive effect in using them. They where not 100% color neutral, somethimes they caused flare and because they are made from resin they also affect the sharpness. The biggest downside is that the transition in these filters zone is straight...this makes them not usable in landscapes where objects (mountains, trees, buildings) are above the zone between bright sky and dark foreground. In these situations you darken the sky...but also the top part of the objects.

I always take two photographs from the same scene.I always use a sturdy tripod to take both photo's. A first one exposed for the sky(brighter) and a second photo exposed for the foreground(darker). I use the camera histogram to get the exposure so that in the first photo(the sky exposure) the highlights are pushed as far to the right of the histogram as possible without touching the side of the histogram ( if the grafic touches the right side of the histogram jou get clipped unrecoverable highlights in the photo). In the second photo(the foreground exposure photo) i use the histogram to push the shadows as close to the left side of the histogram but again without touching it (if the grafic touches the left side of the histogram you get clipped unrecoverable shadows in the photo). If jou do this you get two perfect pictures to make a blend. In some rare situations its possible that jou need a third photo to make the transition zone between light and dark more smooth...but in 99% of the time two exposures are enough.

In following link you can see two simpel methods to blend your two photo's. The first method is for a straight horizon...the second for an uneven horizon. http://www.ronbigelow.com/articles/neutral-density/neutral-density.htm

Succes !


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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 10:38 am 
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Brilliant, thanks very much. Your workflow description seems very clear and I'll be giving this a go as soon as the weather picks up. The link you've provided is bookmarked already so I'll get back to this. I've often wondered what the use of the histogram was during shooting, now I wonder no more.

Thanks again mate for the clear and concise instructions.

Zorro 8)

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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 11:13 am 
LahLahSr wrote:
Whoa - what's NOT to like about these pictures??!

Very nicely done.

They both looks a little HDR-like to me - not that this is a bad thing by definition. My impression is merely, when seeing them, that this light cannot be "real".

This is not a critique by any means, just an observation.

Looking forward to seeing more pictures from that area if you make more, they are really a treat to behold!

Cheers :-)



Hi

Thanks for the comment LahLahSr.

I always try to avoid that my photo's get a HDR'ish look but somethimes its almost impossible to do. My intentions are to get the photo's to look as close as possible to that what my eyes could see at that location. Since i do not use a laptop or pc at the lokation the results that i get by blending seperate photo's are based on my memory of what i could see. A camera is in reality a stupid thing not capable of capturing the scene the way my (small :lol: )brains do. Looking at a photo on the lcd screen from the cam and looking at the real life scene is always a big dissapointment to me. So i need to use some trickery to get improvement in the final photo. Somethimes i get carried away in improving the photo in such a manner that it can look unreal to others......but at that moment i do not always see this effect myself. Its a very thin line thats easely crossed. Some day i hope to have a camera that can capture the same dynamic range as my brains....until that day comes i try to experiment. Its very good that you mentioned the faint hdr effect....it means its not perfect and that i need to work on my workmethod some more.

Peter


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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 11:22 am 
Thanks a lot! Very useful, this is sure to come in handy.


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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 11:45 am 
zorro wrote:
Brilliant, thanks very much. Your workflow description seems very clear and I'll be giving this a go as soon as the weather picks up. The link you've provided is bookmarked already so I'll get back to this. I've often wondered what the use of the histogram was during shooting, now I wonder no more.

Thanks again mate for the clear and concise instructions.

Zorro 8)



The histogram is the best tool in judging the exposure in the field.If you just need one exposure from a scene to get a good photo ...you best try to get the grafic in the histogram as far to the right side as possible without actually touching the histograms edge. If by looking at the histogram the highlight are as close to the right as possible ....but the shadows at the left side are touching the left side of the histogram you know you wil need a second exposure to get a good photo. This means the contrast difference in the scene is higher than your camera can capture in just one photo.
Some photographers adjust the exposure afterwards when they get home
and they have a hard time in getting a good exposed photo. Even working in Raw (or Nef) is not always the key to succes in that matter. Cranking the exposure upwards from an underexposed photo will always cause shadownoise and loss of detail in the shadowzone. Correcting an overexposed(clipped) photo by lowering the exposure wil get you good results without noise in the midtones and shadows.......but there are details gone from the highlights, and there's no way to get them back.
Raw's are not perfect but they are much better than jpeg files....jou can always stretch the exposure in a Raw file a bit more than in Jpeg file.

You could compare Raw and Jpeg to a box of cookies. The Raw file is a full box of cookies ...the Jpeg is an empty box. At the outside both boxes look exactly the same....same good looking colors.......its only when jou open the empty jpeg cookiebox that you will be dissapointed :wink:


Last edited by Houtmeyers Peter on Thu May 01, 2008 11:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 11:46 am 
the pictures are brilliant! :) it's kind of... HDR but not quite! :) excellent job!

Cheers,
HNV


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