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 Post subject: wild weather
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 7:28 am 
so the surf is quite literally going to be up in southern california this weekend... and i'm *hoping* to get out and photograph some of it... however, i'm concerned about the safety of my equipment. i don't own any l-series lenses (canon shooter) so none of my lenses are sealed and i'm expecting the humidity to be up, and it's going to be chilly too. to avoid condensation inside the camera i plan on using my vehicle's heater to slowly bring my equipment back up to a normal temp before i bring it into my fully heated apartment, but other than that, can you guys offer any tips for keeping my equipment safe and still getting off some awesome weather shots?

the plan is to go out and i will likely be shooting a combination of film and digital this weekend... i want to try my hand at some long exposures with both using a nd filter. we're expecting 10-15ft swells on average with some reaching 18 feet so it should be a sight to see, and photograph! any tips would be helpful.. i've shot the beach before but never in the weather and never with swells this high!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 4:08 pm 
Well i dont really think it will be a problem to photograph in high humidity and what are the temperatures going to be like? I couldn't really give you much advice except for ive been watching that huge storm off your coast really developing and your gonna get like 1-3 inches of rain lol.. and the mountains are going to get 1-3 feet and they said some were getting 4 or 5 feet!! :shock: :shock: AMAZING.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 4:40 pm 
emp, down by the coast it shouldn't be too cold. even the mountains don't get cold cold - not like back east. sure they get snow, but it only hasta be 32 degrees for it to snow so... it usually doesn't get much colder than that. this is typical for southern california... we have wet and dry seasons.. fires/flood/fires/flood on and on lol..

my main concern is my lenses with the moisture. they're not the l-series lenses (if they were i wouldn't think twice about it) so they don't have the same level of sealing that the more expensive ones do - but they still cost a good amount of money and i'd rather them not get damaged if i can help it. nothing like lens mold to ruin a photographers day....


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 4:53 pm 
Yeah i see what your saying but i wouldnt be too worried about it. Canon wouldnt make lenses that you can only use when the condition are like 40-90 degrees and low humidity that would limit you in so many regions. So i think that your lenses are up to it but you would know better than me. Ive been to the beach plenty of times over here back east and ive brought compacts on the beach and stuff and its really not a problem and it never feels like theres a ton of moisture or anything. Is the air real salty there? I suppose it is. I do know that any metal thats at the beach gets rusted even if it hasnt even gotten touched by water just because of the humidity and corrosive salt so to me as long as your not out there too long with your camera and when you get back you wipe off all your lenses with cleaning solution (wipes or something) and camera and maybe clean your sensor and stuff i think it will be just fine.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:09 pm 
Hi b.,

If you think it's going to be very humid and there is a risk for your gear, then you could try to wrap your camera and lens in a plastic "bag".

If you have a bit of time before the event and think this might help, you could try and customize a large zip-lock bag in order to contain your camera and lens while leaving the front element and maybe the viewfinder uncovered. I found this link with a detailed how-to and some pictures. You could try it out!
http://www.instructables.com/id/Camera-Zip-lock/

EDIT: Certainly it's not water-proof but I think it can help quite a bit. This might be a bad idea though if your lens is not Internal Focusing and a downside is that you might have a slightly harder time rotating the lens barrel. Also you have to be careful to allow enough room for the lens to fully extend. But all-in-all, it's a cheap and easy way to protect your camera against sand, dust, humidity and maybe even from a small drizzle. :)

I'll actually try it myself as I know it will come in handy at some point. Hope this helps!


Last edited by Andy on Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:23 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:12 pm 
that's a great idea andy! thanks!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:22 pm 
sorry ... edited it two minutes ago to add a bit more detail... and also some things you might have to consider :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:24 pm 
andy - the lens in question is my 28-135 and yaeh, it's internally focusing (what a concept.. i <3 it with polarizers)...

my other consideration was just picking up a 'plastic fantastic' 50mm that canon makes... it's highly popular and cheeeeeeeap. ~$75-$100. it'd save my significantly more expensive zoom and still get great shots.

ziploc's still cheaper though ;)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:27 pm 
Good idea B ide pick up the "PLASTIC FANTASTIC" and atleast you have a fast prime in the future too and you dont have to worry about ruining your zoom. 8)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:52 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:28 pm
Posts: 1065
Location: Syracuse, NY
b.

Get as creative as possible, use lots of bags to make one that will work for you.

Try maybe doing what the instructables andy posted suggests, and using a filter to attach a bag, but just use that for your lens, make sure it's got enough slack to be able to be fully zoomed, then take another bag and cut a hole in it for your lens, and put the lens through and bring it all the way back to the body and tape the two pieces together. Then maybe this is a bit of a neat idea get some latex/plastic gloves that are a bit large for you then cut some holes in the bag large enough for your writsts tape the gloves inside the bag, and when you seal the bag you put the gloves on and your hands are inside the bad but heres no holes. just so you can have full control.

Jake

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:54 pm 
jake - you aren't an engineer are you? lol, 'cause that's exactly the type of solution my engineer husband would come up with.. good idea!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 6:59 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 9:28 pm
Posts: 1065
Location: Syracuse, NY
b. wrote:
jake - you aren't an engineer are you? lol, 'cause that's exactly the type of solution my engineer husband would come up with.. good idea!


Saw a similar set up on Deadliest Catch: behind the scenes episode a while ago. I wish I was engineer, i think i'd be able to afford the 40d if I was :)

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Jake O'Connell, 40D Crew
Canon EOS 40D | 28-135mm IS | 50mm f/1.8 |Vivitar DF 383 | Vivitar 285hv
My Flickr
my Blog
"Photography isn't so much about the results as it is the collective experience, your interactions with people and with the world"


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 7:58 pm 
b. You can also slip one or two of those silica gel desiccant packets (the moisture absorbing thingies) into the zip-lock to help it stay moisture free. (useful tip i read about)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 9:50 pm 
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Location: Germany
I was shooting with my *not sealed* D80 at a rainy day in Milford sound, New Zealand, where the gist from the waterfalls was making everything dripping wet.
Well, I was not holding my camera into the gist, but other than that did not use any protection.
The major issue was the spray on the front-lens and the constant need to wipe this away with something clean and dry. Because after an afternoon out there I had nothing left clean and dry. And i wish I had a UV-filter back then, because this is so much easier to clean: juts screw it off and hold it under clean water, towel dry and off you go :wink:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:03 pm 
........ living near and shooting by the ocean I use these......
http://www.naturescapes.net/store/produ ... bestseller

I find that my lens and camera body becomes protected from the sea spray. There are a number of different makes for sale on the net, and if you know someone handy with a sewing machine, not hard to make one or 2


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