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Do you usually use the biggest F stop for Landscape photography?
Yes, most of the time. 0%  0%  [ 0 ]
Nope, I'd prefer using few stop lower from bigger F stop of my lens. 33%  33%  [ 7 ]
Well, it depends (share your views) 67%  67%  [ 14 ]
Total votes : 21
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 2010 5:19 pm 
In general, given reasonable good day-light, I am very curious in knowing do most people use biggest F stop for landscape photography?


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 2010 5:44 pm 
i think thats depends on the situation really, but i think faster aperture will do both low-light and watever the light situation since you can just increase the aperture priority.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 1:07 am 
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It’s all about what’s in the frame and what do you want to achieve.
First of all one has to decide what to shoot, then to look for the frame that would make the shot, and only after that to decide the technical details that would make the picture that he/she wants. It’s limiting to have an aperture set from the beginning.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 3:38 am 
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Most lenses are sharpest around f7 - f11, or so I've read, which also provides suitable depth of field for most landscape shots.

Apparently, my lenses are sharpest around f/8, so assuming I want a wide DOF and there's sufficient light, this is where I set my aperture.

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PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 9:16 am 
I'd go for anything between 8 and 11 most of the time... If you haven't got anything really near, then it's enough. The standard lenses usually show their best at around F8, so I'd go for this choice. At F22 or 32 the quality drops quite significantly, and due to lower shutter speeds, you're likely to get things like movement of the leaves etc...

All in all - it depends on what you want to achieve :)


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 03, 2010 10:27 am 
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Typically I opt for f/8 or f/11 if I want to maximise DoF on my EOS 5D Mark II. A higher f-number risks softening the image through diffraction and isn't usually warranted. At what f-number diffraction softening becomes an issue depends on the pixel density on your sensor. If this is a new concept then a good starting point is this tutorial. You can see from the interactive chart that for a typical compact camera's sensor the largest available aperture (smallest f-number) is usually needed to avoid the effects of diffraction but DoF on such a camera is still OK as you can see from this tutorial.

Bob.

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 04, 2010 4:14 am 
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For me, it depends.

If there's nothing in the foreground of any interest then I can get away with a faster aperture if required due to light. Generally I try to keep away from a fully closed aperture due to diffraction, but If I'm after a particular effect (like using a ND filter to induce movement in clouds or smoothing in water) I'm not afraid of going to F22 or so.

As said before, it depends on lens and camera. Some of my lenses are more forgiving to high apertures than others. While I've got camera and tripod out, I'll try all sorts of apertures on the same scene to see how diffraction afffects the image, and to see what I can get away with if required. If you've made the effort to get the shot, then there's no harm in trying out variations while you at the location...


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 5:54 pm 
Very informative from everyone. Thank you.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 6:34 pm 
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If I have nothing special in mind I use f/5.6-f/8.0 for standard landscapes, but:
- if it's dark (dusk, dawn, bad weather) I go to larger apertures (smaller numbers) like f/2.8 to keep the exposure times short enough (I never use a tripod)
- if I have closer foreground it depends on whether the foreground is unimportant (--> larger aperture to blur it) or important (-->smaller aperture to keep in sharp)

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 05, 2010 8:36 pm 
Bob, thanks for the website, im using 5DM2 too. Using 24-105mm.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:03 am 
Thanks for the link Bob.
I normally use f/3.5, 5.6, 8 and 11.
I also try to use higher aperture values at times but normally don't to prevent camera shake.


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