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 Post subject: 6900 Zoom Queries
PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2007 6:42 pm 
Hello everyone. Good site you got here. I found it while looking for digital photography resources.

Anyway, I was wondering if you could help with some queries I have regarding my very old "bridge" camera I have, which is a Fujifilm 6900 Zoom. So old that it isn't even mentioned on the site, although some of its sucessors have. It has served me well for a long time, having taken quite a few holiday and special event snapshots with it. My main gripes with it however is that its autofocus is pretty slow, taking a few seconds to actually take a picture, the battery seems to lack staying power, especially after heavy duty use of the flash and that it uses Smart Media cards, which are very hard to come by now, so I needed any more, I'm probably out of luck.

Anyway, I was wondering if there was any point to purchasing a flash gun to upgrade this camera, as it has a hot shoe on it. And what I should look out for when doing so. And if you don't think it is viable, what camera should I get to replace it? I am considering getting an entry level DSLR of some sort and narrowed it down to a couple, however that doesn't make things any easier for me.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2007 6:53 pm 
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Sorry Dean,

but the flash is not going to help you. To the contrary: flash pictures normally look worse than available light photos.
So you're certainly better off, if you keep the money for the flash and invest in some new gear.
Any idea already for a budget?

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Thomas (beware: Nikon-fanboy and moderator!) My Lens Reviews, My Pictures, My Photography Blog
D800+assorted lenses


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2007 9:55 pm 
tombomba2 wrote:
Sorry Dean,

but the flash is not going to help you. To the contrary: flash pictures normally look worse than available light photos.
So you're certainly better off, if you keep the money for the flash and invest in some new gear.
Any idea already for a budget?


Really? Hmm...odd that. Oh well.

As for budget, around £400-£500 ($790-$990 US). If I'm lucky, I might be able to stretch it to £600 ($ 1190) but I doubt it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2007 10:09 pm 
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Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
Hi Dean, welcome to the Cameralabs forums!

Your budget will get you a number of excellent DSLRs including the Canon 400D / XTi, Olympus E-400 or E-410, Nikon D40 or D40x or the Sony A100. Any will give you a massive difference in image quality and overall handling compared to your current model.

Gordon


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2007 11:23 pm 
Hi Gordon. Thanks for the advice. That brings me to my next question.

I was looking at the Sony A100 and Canon EOS400/Rebel XTi. It leaves me with something of a dilemma as they both seem pretty good. And the addition of the D40x doesn't help. :lol: So far I'm leaning to the Sony A100 as it has the anti-shake. Does that feature help much with photography in low light/no flash environments?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2007 12:45 am 
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Hi Dean, any kind of anti-shake, be it body or lens based, will greatly help shooting in low light at slow shutter speeds - although remember it won't freeze a subject in motion, such as someone walking past.

To compare the 400D against the A100, check out our 10 Megapixel group test here:

http://www.cameralabs.com/features/10Me ... DSLR_test/

Then have a look at our D40x review here:

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/NikonD40x/

The verdict pages of each feature should help you weigh up the pros and cons...

Gordon


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2007 12:49 am 
Thanks. I already read through your reviews but it doesn't hurt to look through them again. Still doesn't make it any easier though. I like the look of the 400D/Rebel XTi and it's fast AF and overall image quality but the A100 is quite the contender as well...Hmm...this will be a hard one to choose.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2007 6:31 pm 
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Yeah, that's a tough task, selecting a new camera!

but fortunately most of the new offerings from the industry are quite good quality, so you cannot really go wrong.
Perhaps you tell us, what you preferred kind of photography is, and what featuresrank high on your list when deciding for the next cam!?
- compact size?
- superzoom?
- viewfinder vs. LCD-lifeview?
- wide angle?
- changeable lenses?
- fast focus/trigger?
- lots of options/manual adjustments?
- are you going to manipulate your pics on a computer?
-...

_________________
Thomas (beware: Nikon-fanboy and moderator!) My Lens Reviews, My Pictures, My Photography Blog
D800+assorted lenses


Last edited by Thomas on Tue May 29, 2007 9:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2007 7:57 pm 
I own a Konica Minolta Dynax 5D which is the predecessor of Sony A100 and my experience is that the anti-shake works very well even in daylight situation to get you sharp images more often. And the A100's anti-shake should be even better than the 5D as far as I know so I can highly recommend an anti-shake solution. It is also possible to buy lenses with anti-shake/image stabilization for the Canon 400D so I think the best thing is to try them both out at a store if you are in a doubt.

As you can see here it is possible to get some good deals on used lenses for a KM/Sony DSLR if you are careful :) Wouldn't recommend fleabay though :(


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2007 9:26 pm 
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While on the subject of anti-shake, I should also mention one of the big disadvantages of body-based stabilisation like on the A100 and K10D is you can't see their effect through the viewfinder. If you have a big lens, you'll still see it wobbling as you take the photo, which can be annoying if you want precise compositions.

As anyone who's used a stabilised lens will tell you, it's very reassuring to see the composition just steady itself in the viewfinder.

The forthcoming Olympus E-510 offers a unique solution though: it has built-in anti-shake, but also Live View, which I hope will let you see the effect on the screen!

Gordon


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2007 9:40 pm 
tombomba2 wrote:
Yeah, that's a tough task, selecting a new camera!

but fortunately most of the new offerings from the industry are quite good quality, so you cannot really go wrong.
Perhaps you tell us, what you preferred kind of photography is, and what featuresrank high on your list when deciding for the next cam!?
- compact size?
- superzoom?
- viewfinder vs. LCD-lifeview?
- wide angle?
- changeable lenses?
- fast focus/trigger?
- lots of options/manual adjustments?
- are you going to manipulate your pics on a computer?
-...


Well, I do mostly holiday snapshots and scenery photography alongside indoor photographs of family, relatives and some large public events.

Other factors are it has to be fairly portable. I'm not expecting something minutely sized but certainly overly larger than my current camera. Also the camera has to have a fast autofocus. At least faster than the clunky mechanism on the 6900 (I intend on learning how to manual focus as I go but a fast AF would be useful for spontaneous opportunities). Room for expansion is a must and it has to have compatibility with both computer platforms (Mac and PC). I don't do much in the way of photo manipulation but I don't print straight from the camera either, so "PictBridge" is not necessary. In fact although I said I was looking at DSLRs, a higher grade Bridge camera would do just as well for an upgrade.

P.S. Did I mention battery life? ;) It has to be able to withstand a lot of heavy flash use.


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