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PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 2:53 am 
Yeah, I suppose so. I dont know - anybody here edit and save and edit and save jpegs?

I think thats a bonus with JPEGs, not because its more practical because its definitely not - but it keeps you on your toes. You need to pay attention to things like white balance before you shoot.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 2:31 pm 
Sublimity wrote:
Please use Adobe Lightroom 2.0. Your photos will thank you.
This. RAW + Lightroom 2, use it all the time, every time. Period.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 2:35 pm 
pgtips wrote:
Anbesol wrote:
Heres another problem - processing jpegs, and re-saving them as jpegs, every time you save as jpeg, the image goes through yet another compression routine and degrades the image. Time after time after time, it can have a very negative impact on the image.


I've always found this argument against JPEGs to be fairly academic. How many people actually edit the out-of-camera JPEGs directly and then save over it? Most people would duplicate the original JPEG and edit that or if they make edits they'll save it into a lossless format like TIFF or PSD, like you are currently doing. In theory, that could happen. In practice, that never happens unless you were being particularly obtuse.

Having said all that, there's a list on these forums somewhere with new year's resolutions and mine was to shoot JPEGs this year. I'm glad to say I'm still keeping at it and it's helped my photography tremendously as I shift out of the "Oh, I'll photoshop it later" mentality to a more "Get it right in camera" mentality. That's just me though, so YMMV.
I think the Get it right in camera applies much more to lighting and exposure abilities than whether you're shooting JPEG or RAW.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 2:53 pm 
vpell wrote:
pgtips wrote:
Anbesol wrote:
Heres another problem - processing jpegs, and re-saving them as jpegs, every time you save as jpeg, the image goes through yet another compression routine and degrades the image. Time after time after time, it can have a very negative impact on the image.


I've always found this argument against JPEGs to be fairly academic. How many people actually edit the out-of-camera JPEGs directly and then save over it? Most people would duplicate the original JPEG and edit that or if they make edits they'll save it into a lossless format like TIFF or PSD, like you are currently doing. In theory, that could happen. In practice, that never happens unless you were being particularly obtuse.

Having said all that, there's a list on these forums somewhere with new year's resolutions and mine was to shoot JPEGs this year. I'm glad to say I'm still keeping at it and it's helped my photography tremendously as I shift out of the "Oh, I'll photoshop it later" mentality to a more "Get it right in camera" mentality. That's just me though, so YMMV.
I think the Get it right in camera applies much more to lighting and exposure abilities than whether you're shooting JPEG or RAW.

Not white balance, in raw you can shoot Auto, or heck - shoot some completely goofy and totally wrong white balance, then you can just reset it in processing no sweat. Shoot some screwed up white balance in JPEG and you're stuck with it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 2:58 pm 
Anbesol wrote:
vpell wrote:
pgtips wrote:
Anbesol wrote:
Heres another problem - processing jpegs, and re-saving them as jpegs, every time you save as jpeg, the image goes through yet another compression routine and degrades the image. Time after time after time, it can have a very negative impact on the image.


I've always found this argument against JPEGs to be fairly academic. How many people actually edit the out-of-camera JPEGs directly and then save over it? Most people would duplicate the original JPEG and edit that or if they make edits they'll save it into a lossless format like TIFF or PSD, like you are currently doing. In theory, that could happen. In practice, that never happens unless you were being particularly obtuse.

Having said all that, there's a list on these forums somewhere with new year's resolutions and mine was to shoot JPEGs this year. I'm glad to say I'm still keeping at it and it's helped my photography tremendously as I shift out of the "Oh, I'll photoshop it later" mentality to a more "Get it right in camera" mentality. That's just me though, so YMMV.
I think the Get it right in camera applies much more to lighting and exposure abilities than whether you're shooting JPEG or RAW.

Not white balance, in raw you can shoot Auto, or heck - shoot some completely goofy and totally wrong white balance, then you can just reset it in processing no sweat. Shoot some screwed up white balance in JPEG and you're stuck with it.
That's true. But that's even a good example for what I was saying. Letting your Camera do all the processing work, is still processing work. I think the ultimate goal to be set in this arena is getting it right in camera while shooting RAW. heh.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 3:06 pm 
I guess what I'm trying to say is that, shooting JPEG for the reasons stated by pgtips seems a bit more like "Fixing it right in camera" than "getting it right in camera", you might be shooting it wrong, but the in camera processing will never let you know it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 4:29 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 12:48 pm
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Do you *really* need to quote so much???

At the end of the day, the end result is what matters. If a jpeg is "good enough" does it matter? While holding less data than raw, I have found them highly editable while retaining a great output. Colour corrections and lighting adjustments are easy enough.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 5:23 pm 
vpell wrote:
I guess what I'm trying to say is that, shooting JPEG for the reasons stated by pgtips seems a bit more like "Fixing it right in camera" than "getting it right in camera", you might be shooting it wrong, but the in camera processing will never let you know it.


JPEG has a lot less processing latitude than RAW files, so I have no idea what you mean by in-camera processing never letting you know that you're shooting wrong. If anything, the opposite is more accurate. Shooting in RAW and then running it through a RAW converter and enabling automatic exposure correction will tend to hide most metering flaws.

The issue I'm having is one that's more mental than anything real. I've stated this before elsewhere, but I'll reiterate it here. I find that when I'm shooting in JPEG, I approach photography slightly differently. I end up taking more time per shot, this not only allows me to carefully consider what white balance to use, this slowing down also allows me to focus more on composition.

At the end of the day, this is what works for me and it's the most efficient workflow that I've discovered. YMMV (your mileage might vary) of course.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 5:25 pm 
popo wrote:
At the end of the day, the end result is what matters. If a jpeg is "good enough" does it matter? While holding less data than raw, I have found them highly editable while retaining a great output. Colour corrections and lighting adjustments are easy enough.


QFT. All edits you can do in RAW can be just as easily done in JPEG. RAW just allows you to perform more drastic edits.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 6:08 pm 
pgtips wrote:
vpell wrote:
I guess what I'm trying to say is that, shooting JPEG for the reasons stated by pgtips seems a bit more like "Fixing it right in camera" than "getting it right in camera", you might be shooting it wrong, but the in camera processing will never let you know it.


JPEG has a lot less processing latitude than RAW files, so I have no idea what you mean by in-camera processing never letting you know that you're shooting wrong. If anything, the opposite is more accurate. Shooting in RAW and then running it through a RAW converter and enabling automatic exposure correction will tend to hide most metering flaws.


Then don't enable automatic exposure correction.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2009 6:52 pm 
vpell wrote:
Then don't enable automatic exposure correction.


That still doesn't detract from the fact that JPEGs provide less latitude for post processing than RAW files, so I don't understand your original comment.


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