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 Post subject: New to the Board
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:32 pm 
Just wanted to say hello to everyone. Hope to learn alot about this new hobby that I'm diving into. I bought a D3000 w/ kit lens 18-55mm over the weekend. I know its not that great of a camera but its at least something to get me started. I lost my P&S a few weeks ago so I figured I might as well upgrade a little. I'll be using it alot for my snowboarding trips. Not quite sure what settings are recommended for those type shots. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:37 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 08, 2007 6:30 pm
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Location: The Netherlands, Ridderkerk
Welcome xiven to the Camera Labs forum! Great choice to upgrade after losing your P&S!

As a quick tip for shooting your snowboarding trips: try to keep the shutter speeds short enough to freeze the action.

- Bjorn -

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Leica M9-P (my article on Camera Labs) | Leica D-Lux 5 | 50mm Summilux


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 3:57 pm 
Thanks!

How short of a shutter speed do you think? Should I be ok w/ my kit lens for now? I've been looking at a 55-200mm but I'm not sure if that will be ok for action shots. Should I just leave the ISO on Auto or should I tweak it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 4:20 pm 
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I rarely shoot sports, so I'd advice checking out the Sports section here:

http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=21

Your kitlens will be good for sports if you can get up close to the action. If you need some distance between you and your subjects, you may need to get that 55-200mm, or indeed any other telephoto lens.
I'd suggest to never use Auto ISO, but if that's easier for you at the moment, you could. Maybe you can limit the values Auto ISO will choose (to, say, ISO 1600). That way, you won't end up with too noisy photos.

- Bjorn -

_________________
Street and documentary photographer | Google+ | Twitter

Leica M9-P (my article on Camera Labs) | Leica D-Lux 5 | 50mm Summilux


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 5:51 pm 
hello xiven

i have the same kit as you. nikons auto iso function is very helpful imo. you can set both the lowest acceptable shutter speed and the highest iso allowed. the camera will then - according to the available light in the environment - adjust aperture and / or shutter speed while keeping iso at the exact value you set in the shooting screen. as light gets lower, it opens aperture and / or increases shutter speed to the allowed max. and only if light gets even lower it will start to increase iso up to your set max value. if it gets even lower it will drop shutter speed below your set minimum but it will never increase iso above your max.

so for snowboarding shots (during the day i assume) you will have plenty of light anyway. just set iso to 100 and set the auto iso-function to ON. then you probably want to shoot in shutter priority mode.

as bjorn said, your 18-55 is probably fine for snowboarding since you can get close to the action. but if you want to shoot indoors in low light conditions i really recommend to get a fast prime lens like the AF-S 35/1.8 or 50/1.4


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 7:57 pm 
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Welcome on-board xiven!

In addition to what the others have said, lots of bright snow often fools the camera into under-exposing, so if your photos are looking a little dark, try applying some exposure compensation, of, say, +0.6 or +1 EV. See our tutorial section for tips on how to do this.

And as Bjorn says, have a look in the sports section and feel free to start a new thread discussing tips for this kind of thing (if you don't find one in the first few pages which addresses it).


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jan 27, 2010 9:56 pm 
I may be on the snow on Sunday. I don't really want to be figiting with the settings when its cold and I'm sitting in hill traffic. So I want to know exactly what settings I need to have it on before I go. The weather looks like its going to be sunny but cold.

Which tutorial is for setting the underexposing? What settings should I be at in Shutter Priority Mode? I'm guessing I'll need to set continuous shooting mode for these action shots. Maybe, maybe not.

I'm going to wrap the camera in a shirt and keep it in my camelback. It should be ok in that. My pack has some decent padding.


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